2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

81 - 90 of 475 results for: all courses

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 184: Spirituality and Healing (HUMBIO 179S)

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 102B: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ANTHRO 206A)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 103: History of Archaeological Thought

Introduction to the history of archaeology and the forms that the discipline takes today, emphasizing developments and debates over the past five decades. Historical overview of culture, historical, processual and post-processual archaeology, and topics that illustrate the differences and similarities in these theoretical approaches.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meskell, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 12: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 135: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 235, CHINGEN 118, CHINGEN 218)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

(Formerly CLASSART 113/213.) Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ASNAMST 112: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 112, ANTHRO 212)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 265: Writing Asian American History (AMSTUD 265, HISTORY 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints