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131 - 140 of 291 results for: all courses

EE 108: Digital System Design

Digital circuit, logic, and system design. Digital representation of information. CMOS logic circuits. Combinational logic design. Logic building blocks, idioms, and structured design. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Lab. *In Autumn, enrollment preference is given to EE majors. Any EE majors who must enroll in Autumn are invited to contact the instructor. Formerly EE 108A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EE 116: Semiconductor Devices for Energy and Electronics

The underpinnings of modern technology are the transistor (circuits), the capacitor (memory), and the solar cell (energy). EE 116 introduces the physics of their operation, their historical origins (including Nobel prize breakthroughs), and how they can be optimized for future applications. The class covers physical principles of semiconductors, including silicon and new material discoveries, quantum effects, band theory, operating principles, and device equations. Recommended (but not required) co-requisite: EE 65 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

EE 124: Introduction to Neuroelectrical Engineering

Fundamental properties of electrical activity in neurons, technology for measuring and altering neural activity, and operating principles of modern neurological and neural prosthetic medical systems. Topics: action potential generation and propagation, neuro-MEMS and measurement systems, experimental design and statistical data analysis, information encoding and decoding, clinical diagnostic systems, and fully-implantable neural prosthetic systems design. Prerequisite: EE 101A and EE 102A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Shenoy, K. (PI)

EE 134: Introduction to Photonics

Photonics, optical components, and fiber optics. Conceptual and mathematical tools for design and analysis of optical communication, sensor and imaging systems. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors. Class project on confocal microscopy or other method of sensing or analyzing biometric data. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: EE 102A and one of the following: EE 42, Physics 43, or Physics 63.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Congreve, D. (PI)

EE 142: Engineering Electromagnetics

Introduction to electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations in static and dynamic regimes. Electrostatics and magnetostatics: Gauss's, Coulomb's, Faraday's, Ampere's, Biot-Savart's laws. Electric and magnetic potentials. Boundary conditions. Electric and magnetic field energy. Electrodynamics: Wave equation; Electromagnetic waves; Phasor form of Maxwell's equations.nSolution of the wave equation in 1D free space: Wavelength, wave-vector, forward and backward propagating plane waves.Poynting's theorem. Propagation in lossy media, skin depth. Reflection and refraction at planar boundaries, total internal reflection. Solutions of wave equation for various 1D-3D problems: Electromagnetic resonators, waveguides periodic media, transmission lines. Formerly EE 141. Pre-requisites: Phys 43 or EE 42, CME 100, CME 102
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Fan, J. (PI)

EE 153: Power Electronics (EE 253)

Addressing the energy challenges of today and the environmental challenges of the future will require efficient energy conversion techniques. This course will discuss the circuits used to efficiently convert ac power to dc power, dc power from one voltage level to another, and dc power to ac power. The components used in these circuits (e.g., diodes, transistors, capacitors, inductors) will also be covered in detail to highlight their behavior in a practical implementation. A lab will be held with the class where students will obtain hands on experience with power electronic circuits. For WIM credit, students must enroll in EE 153 for 4 units. No exceptions. Formerly EE 292J. Prerequisite: EE 101B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EE 180: Digital Systems Architecture

The design of processor-based digital systems. Instruction sets, addressing modes, data types. Assembly language programming, low-level data structures, introduction to operating systems and compilers. Processor microarchitecture, microprogramming, pipelining. Memory systems and caches. Input/output, interrupts, buses and DMA. System design implementation alternatives, software/hardware tradeoffs. Labs involve the design of processor subsystems and processor-based embedded systems. Formerly EE 108B. Prerequisite: one of CS107 or CS 107E (required) and EE108 (recommended but not required).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Trippel, C. (PI)

ENERGY 20N: Technology in the Greenhouse

The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like e more »
The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like electricity and transportation, and that conversion requires technology, as well as policies and markets that enable innovation. The scale of the world¿s energy systems is dauntingly large, and we will need a well-diversified set of options to meet the challenge. Wind, solar, nuclear, carbon capture and storage for fossil fuel use, modified agriculture, electric (and automated) vehicles, advanced air conditioning, and many other technology options exist. We will consider these technologies and ask what barriers will have to be addressed if they are to be deployed at a scale large enough to reduce the impact climate change. The format will be discussions of technologies and their potential with a project and student presentations toward the end of the quarter.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 30N: Busting Energy Myths

Energy myths and misconceptions to better equip participants to understand a pathway for global energy transformation. Key concepts developed and employed include energy [kinetic, potential, chemical, thermal, etc.], power, heat, renewables, efficiency, transmission, and life cycle analysis. Throughout this seminar groups of students are challenged with "energy myths" and their task is to deconstruct these myths and convince their classmates in oral presentations that they have indeed done so. Emphasis is on critical and analytical thinking, problem solving and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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