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211 - 220 of 283 results for: all courses

MATSCI 162: X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory (MATSCI 172, PHOTON 172)

Experimental x-ray diffraction techniques for microstructural analysis of materials, emphasizing powder and single-crystal techniques. Diffraction from epitaxial and polycrystalline thin films, multilayers, and amorphorous materials using medium and high resolution configurations. Determination of phase purity, crystallinity, relaxation, stress, and texture in the materials. Advanced experimental x-ray diffraction techniques: reciprocal lattice mapping, reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction. Enrollment limited to 20. Undergraduates register for 162 for 4 units; graduates register for 172 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 165: Nanoscale Materials Physics Computation Laboratory (MATSCI 175)

Computational exploration of fundamental topics in materials science using Java-based computation and visualization tools. Emphasis is on the atomic-scale origins of macroscopic materials phenomena. Simulation methods include molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo with applications in thermodynamics, kinetics, and topics in statistical mechanics. Undergraduates register for 165 for 4 units; graduates register for 175 for 3 units. Prerequisites: Undergraduate physics and MATSCI 144 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics. MATSCI 145 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MATSCI 190: Organic and Biological Materials (MATSCI 210)

Unique physical and chemical properties of organic materials and their uses. The relationship between structure and physical properties, and techniques to determine chemical structure and molecular ordering. Examples include liquid crystals, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, hydrogels, and biopolymers such as lipids, protein, and DNA. Prerequisite: Thermodynamics and ENGR 50 or equivalent. Undergraduates register for 190 for 4 units; graduates register for 210 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 192: Materials Chemistry (MATSCI 202)

An introduction to the fundamental physical chemical principles underlying materials properties. Beginning from basic quantum chemistry, students will learn how the electronic configuration of molecules and solids impacts their structure, stability/reactivity, and spectra. Topics for the course include molecular symmetry, molecular orbital theory, solid-state chemistry, coordination compounds, and nanomaterials chemistry. Using both classroom lectures and journal discussions, students will gain an understanding of and be well-positioned to contribute to the frontiers of materials chemistry, ranging from solar-fuel generation to next-generation cancer treatments. Undergraduates register in 192 for 4 units; graduates register in 202 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 199: Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids (MATSCI 209)

The concepts of electronic energy bands and transports applied to metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The behavior of electronic and optical devices including p-n junctions, MOS-capacitors, MOSFETs, optical waveguides, quantum-well lasers, light amplifiers, and metallo-dielectric light guides. Emphasis is on relationships between structure and physical properties. Elementary quantum and statistical mechanics concepts are used. Prerequisite: MATSCI 195/205 or equivalent. Undergraduates register for 199 for 4 units; graduates register for 209 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MED 50N: Translational Research: Turning Science into Medicine

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Preference to first-year students. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MI 116: The Human Virosphere (MI 216)

Focus on interaction of humans and viruses from a number of perspectives: historical, cultural, political, and demographic. Organismal, molecular biological, biochemical, human and viral interactions; clinical aspects of viral disease, epidemiology and risk factors, public and international health, aspects of virology including emerging viruses and biological weapons. Case studies involving particular viruses: human herpes viruses, retroviruses, oncogenic viruses; vaccination and disease eradication, evolution of viruses as tools for research and therapy. Emphasis on general principles of biology and matters of decision making policy.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MUSIC 192A: Foundations of Sound-Recording Technology

This course serves as an introduction to the recording facilities and technology at CCRMA. Through studio based exercises and sessions students learn and practice various techniques to improve their audio literacy such as; studio operation and maintenance; microphone selection and placement giving regard to basic room and instrument acoustics; audio effects processing, concentrating on equalization and compression;other topics such as sample making/editing, mixing techniques, and audio software. Prerequisites: MUSIC 101 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
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