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201 - 210 of 227 results for: all courses

PWR 194DH: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Empathy, Ethics, and Compassion Meditation (CSRE 94)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. In this course, we'll extend this discussion by expanding our thinking about rhetoric as a means of persuasion to consider its relation to empathy-as a mode of listening to and understanding audiences and communities we identify with as well as those whose beliefs and actions can be lethal. We'll also practice compassion medication and empathetic rhetoric to see how these ethical stances affect us individually and investigate the ways they may and may not be scaled to address social justice more broadly. Finally, with the course readings and discussions in mind, you will explore a social justice issue and create an essay, a workshop, campaign or movement strategy, podcast, vlog, infographic, Facebook group, syllabus, etc. to help move us closer to positive change. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

PWR 194KD: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Technology and Human Values

Pining for a job in Google X but a little afraid of what disrupting the next social system will do to humans when all is said and done? Unsure where the real conversation is happening at Stanford about how to think more carefully and thoughtfully about the tech we are being trained to make? Curious to know what underlying common ground might link fuzzies with techies, humanists with engineers, scientists with philosophers? These are some of the issues we¿ll address in this seminar. You will be able to choose your own current topic¿drones, tech and medicine, Big Data, Cloud applications, AI and consciousness, cybersecurity, tech and the law¿for which you will choose readings and write a seminar paper and then co-lead discussion. The class goals are to know better the ethical value of one¿s tech work and research and to be able to express to scientists and non-scientists alike the ways in which this work contributes to the greater human good (beyond strict convenience or short-term profit). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

PWR 194SS: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Making Rhetoric Matter: Human Rights at Home (CSRE 194SS)

'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, ' more »
'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, 'translating' ideas into new media (does someone you know need an animated video about gender pronouns? Or maybe it's time for a podcast about #PrisonRenaissance?), doing collaborative research, and 'writing back' to our audiences. For course video and full description see: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/making-rhetoric-matter-human-rights-home.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

RELIGST 17N: Love, Power, and Justice: Ethics in Christian Perspective

From its inception, the Christian faith has, like all religions, implied an ethos as well as a worldview, a morality and way of life as well as a system of beliefs, an ethics as well as a metaphysics. Throughout history, Christian thinkers have offered reasoned accounts of the moral values, principles, and virtues that ought to animate the adherents of what eventually became the world's largest religion. We will explore a variety of controversial issues, theological orientations, and types of ethical reasoning in the Christian tradition, treating the latter as one 'comprehensive doctrine' (John Rawls) among many; a normative framework (actually a variety of contested religious premises, moral teachings, and philosophical arguments) formally on par with the religious ethics of other major faiths as well as with the various secular moral theories typically discussed in the modern university. We will learn to interpret, reconstruct, criticize, and think intelligently about the coherence and persuasiveness of moral arguments offered by a diverse handful of this religious tradition's best thinkers and critics, past and present.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

RELIGST 119: Religion and Conflict

What is the relationship between religion and conflict? Can religious movements, ideologies, and actors cause conflicts or make them better or worse? This course looks at theories of religion and conflict, religious approaches to conflict resolution or peacebuilding, and examines case studies of conflicts involving religion.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

RELIGST 123: The Hindu Epics and the Ethics of Dharma (CLASSICS 125)

The two great Hindu Epics, the Mahabharata and Ramayana, offer a sustained reflection on the nature of virtuous living in the face of insoluble ethical dilemmas. Their treatment of the concept of dharma, understood simultaneously as ethical action and the universal order that upholds the cosmos, lies at the heart of both Gandhian non-violent resistance and communalist interreligious conflict. This course will focus on a reading of selections from the Epics in English translation, supplemented with a consideration of how the texts have been interpreted in South Asian literary history and contemporary politics and public life in India.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

RELIGST 150: Humanities Core: Texts that Changed the World -- The Ancient Middle East (COMPLIT 31, DLCL 31, HUMCORE 31)

This course traces the story of the cradle of human civilization. We will start from the earliest human stories, the Gilgamesh Epos and biblical literature, and follow the path of the development of religion, philosophy and literature in the ancient Mediterranean or Middle Eastern world.We will pose questions about how different we are today. What are our foundational stories and myths and ideas? Should we remain connected in deep ways to the most ancient past of civilization, or seek to distance ourselves from those origins? N.B. This is the first of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer a UNIQUE opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take one, two or all three courses to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

SIMILE 93: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, WAY-SI

SLE 92: Structured Liberal Education

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Augustine, the Qur'an, Dante, Rumi, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Las Casas, Descartes, Locke, Mill, Schleiermacher, and Flaubert.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-2, THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER, Writing SLE

SOC 8: Sport, Competition, and Society

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
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