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EDUC 126A: Ethics and Leadership in Public Service (CSRE 126C, URBANST 126A)

This course explores ethical questions that arise in public service work, as well as leadership theory and skills relevant to public service work. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, assignments, and guest lectures, students will develop a foundation and vision for a future of ethical and effective service leadership. Offered through the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 217: Free Speech, Academic Freedom, and Democracy (ETHICSOC 217X, PHIL 278C)

The course examines connected ideas of free speech, academic freedom, and democratic legitimacy that are still widely shared by many of us but have been subject to skeptical pressures both outside and inside the academy in recent years. The course explores the principled basis of these ideas, how well they might (or might not) be defended against skeptical challenge, and how they might be applied in particular controversies about the rights of students, instructors, and researchers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Callan, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 80N: Modern "Meanings of Life": Aestheticism, Perfectionism, Ecstasy

This course asks about the "meaning of life" in our time, the 21st century, and over the past 200 years. It proposes that some classic reasons for living, and modes of giving value to life, ethics, religion, family are no longer particularly active; while new, poorly articulated and ill-acknowledged systems of life-evaluation rule our senses of meaning. In particular, the course will discover, try to systematize, and then test a few of these covert modern life philosophies: aestheticism; perfectionism; ecstasy. Representatives of more classic systems of meaning Christian experience, and Aristotelian ethics will offer comparative cases. Students will be challenged to articulate and evaluate their own reasons for living and anticipated meanings of life, and to become skillful interpreters of both art and ideas in texts, learning methods from literature, philosophy, and history. They should also develop richer and more precise understandings of those contested terms, modern and modernity. Readings may include Wordsworth, Thoreau, Flaubert, Aristotle, Thomas à Kempis, Theresa of Avila, Whitman, Dickinson, Sontag, plus contemporary sources.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 87N: The Conscience

What kind of knowledge does con-science (lit., a ¿knowing-with¿) impart, and how does it make this knowledge manifest? Given its propensity to fire the imagination, can the conscience be considered a creative principle of fiction itself? In this course, we will consider texts long associated with crises of conscience (among others, selections from Genesis, Macbeth, Moll Flanders, Frankenstein, Hard Times), but will also reflect on a number of watershed events (the English Reformation, the Industrial Revolution) that reshaped notions of moral self-awareness and collective consciousness.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 163D: Shakespeare: The Ethical Challenge (TAPS 163D)

Was the eighteenth century right in proclaiming Shakespeare to be the greatest moral philosopher? What are the ethical challenges Shakespeare's major plays still pose for us? Can we divorce ethical decisions from the contingencies of experience? We will ask a series of normative ethical questions (to do with pleasure, power, old age, self-sacrifice, and truth telling) and attempt to answer them in relation to the dramatic situation of Shakespeare's characters on the one hand and our own cultural situation on the other. The ethical challenge of Shakespearean drama will be set against selected readings in ethical theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 167H: The Ethical Gangster

(English majors must register for 5 units) A study of recent developments in understanding human moral psychology using mafia movies to explore the differences between Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. We will study the greatest hits of gangster fiction and film, from Fielding's Jonathan Wild to The Sopranos.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 148: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 248)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://bit.ly/ ENGR148_248_apply2019.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fuchs, J. (PI)

ESF 1: Education as Self-Fashioning: The Active, Inquiring, Beautiful Life

Moving through history from the Rome of the Emperor Hadrian, to the city-states of Renaissance Italy, to the 18th century republic of the United States, we will examine how self-made men fashioned themselves and their surroundings by educating themselves broadly. We will ask how a liberal education made their active careers richer and more transformational. We will also take up the great debate on whether a liberal education or vocational training is the surest path to advancement. We will engage this debate through the works of W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington but consider today's struggle over the same issues, a struggle that engrosses both highly industrialized and developing societies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 7 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESF 1A: Education as Self-Fashioning: The Active, Inquiring, Beautiful Life

Moving through history from the Rome of the Emperor Hadrian, to the city-states of Renaissance Italy, to the 18th century republic of the United States, we will examine how self-made men fashioned themselves and their surroundings by educating themselves broadly.  We will ask how a liberal education made their active careers richer and more transformational. We will also take up the great debate on whether a liberal education or vocational training is the surest path to advancement.  We will engage this debate through the works of W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington but consider today's struggle over the same issues, a struggle that engrosses both highly industrialized and developing societies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 7 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESF 4: Education as Self-Fashioning: Learning to Change

Does education entail changing the self? How much? Why should I change my life? How do I discover that I need to change? Who can rightly tell me how to change? What difference does it make? These and related questions have been around for a long time, yet that makes them no easier to answer today than 2500 years ago. In the 5th century BCE, Socrates found that his answers--based on his own will to change--proved troublesome, and ultimately fatal. His follower, the philosopher Plato, transformed the Socratic exploration into idiosyncratic utopian visions that sought to change the conditions of life--and so make Socrates' fate unrepeatable. Plato's own followers, from Aristotle onward, found new ways to explain, enact, or evade change. Not until the end of antiquity, however, do we find, in Augustine of Hippo (354-430 CE), someone as explicitly and passionately committed to personal change as the early Greek thinker. Bookended by the major figures of the Athenian seeker and the North African, this course will lead students to analyze and compare their own tentative answers with the ideas on self-fashioning that can be found in a range of ancient texts. Students will demonstrate their grasp of the material through a variety of exercises, including a research paper, discourse analyses, and responses in persona.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 7 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER, Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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