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621 - 630 of 804 results for: all courses

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 38: Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Adhikari, M. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 45: Transitional Justice and Transformation Debates in South Africa

Exploration of transitional justice through critical discussion of contemporary South Africa. Conflicting perspectives of the South African transition through an exploration of the creation of the "rainbow nation" as well as discussions over whether a denial of justice for apartheid-era crimes prevails. Decisions made post-apartheid over how best to confront the large-scale human rights abuses of the past, including South Africa's recent past through the lens of the "pillars" of transitional justice: truth seeking, criminal justice, reparations and institutional reform. Issues of structural violence and the legacies of apartheid in order to question to what extent we can consider South Africa to have realised the promises of its transition
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 78: Postcolonial Modernist Art Movements in Africa

Introduction to the complexities and contradictions of 'modernity' and 'modernism(s)' in postcolonial Africa. With a focus on ideology-driven interdisciplinary artistic movements in Senegal, Nigeria, Sudan, Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia and South Africa, examine various schools of thought that were part of modern consciousness that characterised the independence decades. Role that art centres, workshops, collectives and mission schools played in histories of European expansion and colonialism. Debates regarding notions of 'appropriation,' 'natural synthesis' and 'assimilation' interpreted in the context of postcolonial theory. Different modes of production and methodological approaches.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 83: From Cape to California: Settler Colonialism and the Genocide of Indigenous Peopes

Two major social and historical phenomena: genocide and settler colonialism, contextualized within the broad contours of world history as well as the making of European colonialism and Western global domination from the start of European colonial expansion in the fifteenth century to the twentieth century. Emphasis on developing global comparative perspectives focusing on southern African, North and Latin American, as well as Australian case studies. Histories of the place from which students come, California, as well as the place they currently find themselves, the Cape, and the links both have to settler colonialism and the genocidal destruction of indigenous peoples
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 85: Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice in Cape Town

Implicit bias and the value of diversity and inclusion in our society; understanding of bias (explicit vs implicit) and the power that bias has in our every-day lives given implicit bias has such a profound effect on our attitudes, behaviors, and decision making. Students learn of some of their own biases, how they can mitigate them, and through study and visiting local communities and historical sites, appreciate the value of social justice. Power that diversity has in the composition of teams and in society and the importance for all of us to restore and maintain social justice so there can be peace both within and among nations
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 29: The People Amid the Monuments

From both chronological and thematic approaches, examine the efforts of English-speaking writers (and, latterly, film-makers) to get to grips with Italy and the Italians. Beginning in the England of Queen Elizabeth and ending at the present day, cover a variety of themes such as Italy's historical role as a haven for the LGBT community and the modern interest in neglected southern Italy. Illustrative multimedia content with visits to sites of relevance in Florence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 51: Globalization and Social Divisions

The course examines how social diversity and inequality are produced, understood, and enacted in the context of growing global integration. It will explore how existing social arrangements create and maintain social differences among people ¿ social class; race and ethnicity; age, gender and sexuality; citizenship and nationality ¿ and are influenced by cultural, economic and political processes that are increasingly spanning across borders. Analyzing the implications of global forces, relations, and institutions ¿ e.g. the media and cultural industry, tourism, religion, social movements and the human rights regime ¿ will help students understand why the social construction of diversity and inequality today should overcome the "methodological nationalism" that often characterizes the study of social divisions. nnInstructor: Paola Bonizzoni
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPFLOR 64: Colonial Heritage, Euro-Mediterranean Relations, Migrations, Multiculturalism

Analysis of colonialism during the 19th century, with particular reference to French colonialism, followed by discussion of the influence of the colonial heritage on current African and Euro-Mediterranean relations. Consideration from the perspective of colonial law. In addition, discussion of three aspects of Euro-Mediterranean relations: 1) the period from the establishment of the European Economic Community (EEC) up until the beginning of the "Arab Spring"; 2) the new EU policies after the uprisings of the "Arab Spring", and 3) the new EU perspectives after the failure of the "Arab Spring" with the exception of Tunisia. Review of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) in 2011 and in 2015 after the end of the "Arab Spring" revolts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gozzi, G. (PI)

OSPFLOR 65: Exclusion/Inclusion Processes of Migrants in Italian Society

Analysis of the processes of exclusion/inclusion of migrants into Italian society, in a country which has recently become a place of immigration from abroad. It is divided into five parts: 1. Migration theories. 2. Migration policies. 3. Labour market and social mobility. 4. Social representations of migrants. 5. Migration and criminality. Field trips to NGO's
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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