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451 - 460 of 815 results for: all courses

HISTORY 25N: Stalin's Europe, 1944-1948

This freshman seminar explores the history of wartime and postwar Europe through the lenses of the communist parties of Europe, the anti-Soviet forces on the continent, the devastation of the civilian population, and the intentions and actions of the Soviet Union on the one hand, and the United States on the other. We will analyze issues of resistance and collaboration under the Nazis, Allied occupation, and the division of Europe. We will also consider the forcible displacement of peoples and the fate of Jewish survivors. The idea is to understand the harsh and complex realities of European life and politics in this crucial time frame spanning war and peace. One can discover the beginnings of the Cold War in this period, the first signs of the "Iron Curtain," and the origins of the European Union. Our sources for the reconstruction of European life at this crucial time include documents, memoirs, literature, film, and various collections at the Hoover Archives. In addition to analyzing written and visual materials in discussion, presentations, and short essays, you will engage in a quarter long project on one thematic or country study during this period.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

( History 39 is offered for 3 units; History 139 is offered for 5 units.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 41N: Visible Bodies: Black Female Authors and the Politics of Publishing in Africa (AFRICAAM 140N, AFRICAST 51N, ENGLISH 54N)

Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century and the present day? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of modern African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continue to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism, apartheid and globalization. nnYou will be introduced to key twentieth-century and more contemporary female authors from Africa, some of them published but many more unpublished or out-of-print. The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. nnWe will also examine the strategies these write more »
Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century and the present day? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of modern African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continue to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism, apartheid and globalization. nnYou will be introduced to key twentieth-century and more contemporary female authors from Africa, some of them published but many more unpublished or out-of-print. The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. nnWe will also examine the strategies these writers used to mitigate their apparent marginality, including looking at how women self-published, how they used newspapers as publication venues, how they have increasingly turned to digital platforms, and how many sought international publishing networks outside of the African continent. As one of the primary assessments for the seminar, you will be asked to conceptualize and design an in-depth and imaginative pitch for a new publishing platform that specializes in African female authors. nnYou will also have the opportunity for in-depth engagement (both in class and in one-on-one mentor sessions) with a range of leading pioneers in the field of publishing and literature in Africa. Figures like Ainehi Edoro (founder of Brittle Paper) and Zukiswa Wanner (prize-winning author of The Madams and Men of the South), amongst others, will be guests to our Zoom classroom. One of our industry specialists will meet with you to offer detailed feedback on your proposal for your imagined publishing platform. nnYou can expect a roughly 50/50 division between synchronous and asynchronous learning, as well as plenty of opportunity to collaborate with peers in smaller settings.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 44: Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment

( HISTORY 44 is offered for 3 units; HISTORY 144 is offered for 5 units.) Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores Gendered Innovations. Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. The operative questions is: how can sex, gender, and intersectional analysis lead to discovery and enhance social equalities?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 44Q)

Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores ¿Gendered Innovations.¿ Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and emphasizes oral, multimedia presentation, and writing skills. Each student will develop a case study illustrating how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis can lead to innovation and enhance social equalities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2

HISTORY 45N: Power, Prestige and Politics in African Societies

This seminar infuses a human dimension into the study of politics in Africa. Considering the 1800s to the present day, the seminar prompts students to creatively connect the political with the personal. We will examine how gender, intimate and romantic relationships, arguments between parents and children, attempts to access and harness the power of the sacred, and fights for status and authority of all kinds, were pivotal forces shaping the form that politics and political activism assumed on the continent.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 47: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47, CSRE 74)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 47S: Black Earth Rising: Law and Society in Postcolonial Africa

Is the International Criminal Court a neocolonial institution? Should African art in Western museums be returned? Why have anti-homosexuality laws emerged in many African countries? This course engages these questions, and more, to explore how Africans have grappled with the legacies of colonialism through law since independence. Reading court documents, listening to witness testimonies, analyzing legal codes, and watching cultural commentaries¿including hit TV series Black Earth Rising¿students will examine the histories of legal conflict in Africa and their implications for the present and future of African societies. This course fulfills the Social Inquiry and Engaging Diversity Ways requirements.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Teska, W. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
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