2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

171 - 180 of 826 results for: all courses

CHILATST 162: Latin/x America in Motion: An Introduction to Dance Studies (CSRE 162D, DANCE 162L, TAPS 162L, TAPS 262L)

This course introduces students to the field of Dance Studies by examining the histories of Latin American and Caribbean dances and their relationship to developing notions of race and nation in the Americas. We will study the historical emergence and transformation of ¿indigeneity,¿ ¿blackness,¿ ¿whiteness,¿ and ¿Latin/@/x¿ and consider how dance practices interacted with these identifications. No prior experience with Dance or Latin America and the Caribbean necessary.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CHILATST 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CSRE 164, SOC 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 173: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, HISTORY 73, HISTORY 173)

( History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177F, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 181: Latino Social Movements (POLISCI 125M)

Social movements are cooperative attempts to change the world. This course reviews historically significant and contemporary political and social movements in Latino communities in the U.S., including the movements of the 1960s and events of the modern era such as the Spring 2006 marches and student walkouts, the 2010 resistance to Arizona¿s SB1070, and ongoing efforts in 2017 related to detention and deportation policies.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CHILATST 195: U.S. Latinx Art (ARTHIST 194, CSRE 195)

This course surveys artworks made by Latina/o/x artists who live and work in the United States, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and others of Latin American and Caribbean descent. Students will study the diversity that comprises the U.S. Latinx demographic while considering artists' relationships to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. They will also explore national debates, such as immigration and national security, that affect artists and their work. Special attention will be paid to cross-cultural and cross-racial exchanges between artists.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

CHINA 115: Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China (CHINA 215, FEMGEN 150, FEMGEN 250)

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CHINA 155A: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 148, ANTHRO 248, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

CHINA 175: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 135, ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints