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351 - 360 of 617 results for: all courses

JAPAN 124: Manga as Literature (JAPAN 224)

Analysis of representative manga as narratives that combine verbal and visual elements, with attention to historical and cultural background. Representative manga by Tezuka Osamu, Tatsumi Yoshihiro, Koike Kazuo, Taniguchi Jiro, Natsume Ono, Kono Fumiyo, and others. All readings in English.nnnClass meets in Knight Bldg, Rm 018. Contact instructor (sdcarter@stanford.edu) for place
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 138: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan¿s modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. nThe goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s until most recent, post-3/11 catastrophe-evoked Zeitgeist.nnWe will examine a variety of primary texts by such authors as Futabatei Shimei, Higuchi Ichiy¿, Natsume S¿seki, Tanizaki Jun¿ichir¿, Miyamoto Yuriko, Kawabata Yasunari, ¿e Kenzabur¿, Yoshimoto Banana, Tawada Y¿ko, and Yu Miri among others. Each text will be discussed in detail paying attention to its specific character and contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and more »
This class introduces key literary texts from Japan¿s modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. nThe goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s until most recent, post-3/11 catastrophe-evoked Zeitgeist.nnWe will examine a variety of primary texts by such authors as Futabatei Shimei, Higuchi Ichiy¿, Natsume S¿seki, Tanizaki Jun¿ichir¿, Miyamoto Yuriko, Kawabata Yasunari, ¿e Kenzabur¿, Yoshimoto Banana, Tawada Y¿ko, and Yu Miri among others. Each text will be discussed in detail paying attention to its specific character and contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, the social effects of the postwar economic expansion, ecocriticism), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, postmodernism of the 1980s, and exophony). Students will also be encouraged to think about the ways these texts relate to each other and a variety of issues beyond the Japanese socio-cultural and historical context. nnNo prior knowledge of Japanese is required for this course, although students with sufficient proficiency are welcome to refer to original sources.nPrerequisites: None
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 148: Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film (JAPAN 248)

Central issues in modern Japanese visual and written narrative. Focus is on competing views of modernity, war, and crises of individual and collective identity and responsibility. Directors and authors include Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Abe, and Oe.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED

JAPAN 160: Classical Japanese Literature in Translation (JAPAN 260)

Prose, poetry, and drama from the 10th-19th centuries. Historical, intellectual, and cultural context. Works vary each year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 161: Japanese Ghosts: The Supernatural in Japanese Art and Entertainment (JAPAN 261)

The complex meanings of ghosts in Japanese culture. Representations of the supernatural in images, drama, oral narratives, prose, film, comics and animation at different moments in Japanese history.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

JAPAN 163: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 263)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

JAPAN 170: The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception (JAPAN 270)

Approaches to the tale including 12th-century allegorical and modern feminist readings. Influence upon other works including poetry, Noh plays, short stories, modern novels, and comic book ( manga) retellings. Prerequisite for graduate students: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 184: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, ARTHIST 384, JAPAN 284)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

JAPAN 185: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, ARTHIST 387, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

JAPANGEN 75N: Around the World in Seventeen Syllables: Haiku in Japan, the U.S., and the Digital World

Preference to freshmen. Origins of the haiku form in Japan, its place in the discourse of Orientalism during the 19th and early 20th centuries in the West, its appropriation by U.S.devotees of Zen and the beat poets after WW II, and its current transformation into a global form through the Internet.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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