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661 - 670 of 1109 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 122M: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (PEDS 212)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. Med/Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132, CSRE 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 123E: Health Economics & Policy: exploring health disparities, child health & health care spending

This course addresses issues related to population health, health care, and health policy using tools from empirical and theoretical economics. We will study topics such as the demand for health care, socioeconomic disparities in population health outcomes, health insurance design, the role of competition in health care markets, determinants of health care spending, technological change in the health care sector, and pharmaceuticals and the opioid crisis. Throughout the course, we will learn about research methodology that will help us to distinguish correlation from causation, and think critically about the role of the government and public policy. The course will feature concepts from microeconomic theory, statistics, and econometrics. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent, and statistics requirements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 125: Current Topics and Controversies in Women's Health (FEMGEN 256, OBGYN 256)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 125. PhD minor in FGSS must enroll in FEMGEN 256. Med students must enroll in OBGYN 256.) Interdisciplinary. Focus is primarily on the U.S., with selected global women's health topics. Topics include: leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the life course; reproductive (e.g. gynecologic & obstetric) health issues; sexual function; importance of lifestyle (e.g. diet, exercise, weight control), including eating disorders; mental health; sexual and relationship abuse; issues for special populations. In-class Student Debates on key controversies in women's health. Guest lecturers. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. PhD minor in FGSS should enroll for 2 - 3 units. Med students should enroll for 2 units. To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 128: Community Health Psychology (PSYCH 101)

Social ecological perspective on health emphasizing how individual health behavior is shaped by social forces. Topics include: biobehavioral factors in health; health behavior change; community health promotion; and psychological aspects of illness, patient care, and chronic disease management. Prerequisites: HUMBIO 3B or PSYCH 1 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development, culture and human rights. We discuss technical solutions as well as the importance of the social determinants of health, and emphasize multi-sectoral approaches to care. The course is intended to challenge all students to think globally, and is geared for students interested in exploring how their major interests cold be directed to solve global health issues. We provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 146: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286, PSYC 286)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? Optional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 149L: Longevity (NENS 202, PSYCH 102)

Interdisciplinary. Challenges to and solutions for the young from increased human life expectancy: health care, financial markets, families, work, and politics. Guest lectures from engineers, economists, geneticists, and physiologists.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 163: The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law

The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity in more »
The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction and increase the student's ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information. Preference will be given to upperclassmen, especially in the HumBio program. Attendance at first class is mandatory. Enrollment limited to 20 by application only. Applications will be accepted on Sunday, February 28th at midnight, consistent with the Spring Quarter enrollment. Applications will be due on Friday, March 5th at 5:00PM. Applications will be considered in the order received. Apply here: https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/615264add6dc475da6da583f9a41a4b0. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or PSYC 83 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 171: The Death Penalty: Human Biology, Law, and Policy

Combines academic study with student participation in forensic research and case investigation, including DNA evidence, psychological and physiological development, mental and physical disabilities, and witness interviews. The philosophy, structure, and application of capital punishment in the U.S. Goal is to examine and challenge the issues involved in the death penalty from the perspective of involvement in a real case. Course not taught from a preconceived belief or political or philosophical agenda except to involve students in an intellectual challenge of policy and philosophy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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