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51 - 60 of 438 results for: all courses

ARTSTUDI 171: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17¿-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 171S: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17"-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Last offered: Summer 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 173E: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Peck, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 174B: Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks

This class explores the history, practice and technique of creating art on and for the internet. Discussions, projects and readings focus on the ways in which internet art embodies changing ideas about artistic creation, technology, and interactivity as a way of blurring the line between artist and audience. Setting recent work against the backdrop of earlier moments in contemporary art (found object art, photomontage), this course also situates internet art in the pre-internet tradition of finding new perspectives on, and meanings in, overfamiliar or banal media surroundings. In collaborative and individual projects, students will create visual compositions on online platforms such as NewHive and explore social media interventions, Twitter experiments, crowdsourced work, collections of online found imagery, supercuts, GIFs, and "choose your own adventure"- style online storytelling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 177: Video Art I

Students create experimental video works. Conceptual, formal, and performance-based approaches to the medium. The history of video art since the 70s and its influences including experimental film, television, minimalism, conceptual art, and performance and electronic art. Topics: camera technique, lighting, sound design, found footage, cinematic conventions, and nonlinear digital editing. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Jackson, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 178: Art and Electronics

Analog electronics and their use in art. Basic circuits for creating mobile, illuminated, and responsive works of art. Topics: soldering; construction of basic circuits; elementary electronics theory; and contemporary electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 179: Digital Art I

Contemporary electronic art focusing on digital media. Students create works exploring two- and three-dimensional, and time-based uses of the computer in fine art. History and theoretical underpinnings. Common discourse and informative resources for material and inspiration. Topics: imaging and sound software, web art, and rethinking the comptuer as interface and object. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 180: Color (TAPS 180P)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 183: Sports in Contemporary Art

Sport and Art are generally viewed as the polar opposites. You are either interested in art or sport. You can't be both.nThis course examines and questions this generalization and begins with a historical overview of artworks and artists, who uses sport, physical activity, and games as inspiration in their work.nWhether in the form of figurative representations of athletes, to inventing new games, and experiments in order to create artworks that comments on issues as broad as identity, race, gender as well as provoke audience participation through interactive installations and other playful strategies.nBesides from the historical overview and examples presented in the class, the students will be given 4 different assignments, which will allow the students to explore the concept of art in sport and vice versa and produce their own projects in response. The course is interdisciplinary in its form, but students will be introduced to a variety of disciplines and media such as Digital Video more »
Sport and Art are generally viewed as the polar opposites. You are either interested in art or sport. You can't be both.nThis course examines and questions this generalization and begins with a historical overview of artworks and artists, who uses sport, physical activity, and games as inspiration in their work.nWhether in the form of figurative representations of athletes, to inventing new games, and experiments in order to create artworks that comments on issues as broad as identity, race, gender as well as provoke audience participation through interactive installations and other playful strategies.nBesides from the historical overview and examples presented in the class, the students will be given 4 different assignments, which will allow the students to explore the concept of art in sport and vice versa and produce their own projects in response. The course is interdisciplinary in its form, but students will be introduced to a variety of disciplines and media such as Digital Video and Photography, Performance, Sculpture, and Installation Art.nOne of the goals of this course is to demonstrate the many commonalities between art and sport and to encourage a dialogue about this topic as well as bring the two seemingly divergents more together.nSome artist that will be discussed are:nDavid Hammons, Collier Schorr, Paul Pfeiffer, Anne Imhof, Camille Henrot, Gabriel Orozco, Allora & Calzadilla, Chi Kai-Yuan, Hank Willis Thomas, Ana Soler, Jørgen Leth, Cassils and Lee Walton to mention a few.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 184: Art and Environmental Engagement

The aim of this course is to use the tools of art as a means to actively engage with the natural world. Students will be required to go beyond surface representations and dig deep with their work to uncover conceptual, ecological and historical meaning. Whether the focus is on a plant, animal, mineral, or an ecological system, students will be encouraged to investigate and interact with their subjects. Scientists who experiment in the field will be brought in to discuss their research and working processes. Collaborations are welcome. We will examine the work by artists, from past to present, who address the environment in a critical way. Students will work on creative projects with the goal to open new avenues of dialogue between culture and nature.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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