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141 - 150 of 452 results for: all courses

EARTHSYS 154: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (PWR 91EP)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will wri more »
In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 157: Intermediate Writing: Stanford Science Podcast (PWR 91JS)

In this course, students will explore how podcasts can be used as a tool for effective science communication. Through a series of workshops and guest speakers, students in this course will learn the necessary journalistic and technical skills to produce high quality podcast episodes, from interviewing and storytelling to audio editing and digital publishing. Podcast episodes will highlight the cutting edge research being done at Stanford, and students will choose specific stories based on their own interests, from earth sciences to public health to big data. Final podcast episodes will be published on iTunes.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

EARTHSYS 187: FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems

FEED the Change is a project-based course focused on solving real problems in the food system. Targeted at upper-class undergraduates, this course provides an opportunity for students to meet and work with thought-leading innovators, to gain meaningful field experience, and to develop connections with faculty, students, and others working to create impact in the food system. Students in the course will develop creative confidence by learning and using the basic principles and methodologies of human-centered design, storytelling, and media design. Students will also learn basic tools for working effectively in teams and for analyzing complex social systems. FEED the Change is taught at the d.school and is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth. This class requires an application. For application information and more information about our work and about past class projects, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

EARTHSYS 200: Environmental Communication in Action: The SAGE Project

This course is focused on writing about sustainability for a public audience through an ongoing project, SAGE (Sound Advice for a Green Earth), that is published by Stanford Magazine. Students contribute to SAGE, an eco advice column, by choosing, researching, and answering questions about sustainable living submitted by Stanford alumni and the general public. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement).
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

EDUC 141: Counterstory in Literature and Education (CSRE 141E, EDUC 341, LIFE 124)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

EMED 115: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 215)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 123N: Does Social Media Make Better Physicians?

Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or po more »
Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or pod casting, though such experiences or skills are not prerequisites for enrollment. Throughout the seminar, there will be an emphasis on the impact of digital scholarship. Students will have the opportunity to submit high-quality classwork for possible online publication on several medical education sites made available by the course instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Gisondi, M. (PI)

EMED 129: Virtual Reality Storytelling (EMED 228)

Do you have a story to tell? Would you like to make an impact on medicine through the most immersive medium available? Virtual reality filmmaking is a cutting edge means of shaping the public's perception of and relationship to healthcare, with enormous potential to act as a vehicle for change. This course will describe and practice the entire virtual reality filmmaking process from preproduction and production through to postproduction completion. Step by step you will learn to tell stories that matter in this immersive medium using both 360 video and computer generated simulations. You will be part of the design team for an exhibited interactive experience with a meaningful story. No prior virtual reality or filmmaking experience required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Curtis, H. (PI)

EMED 215: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 115)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Merritt, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CA: American Road Trip

From Whitman to Kerouac, Alec Soth to Georgia O'Keeffe, the lure of travel has inspired many American artists to pack up their bags and hit the open road. In this Creative Expressions course we will be exploring the art and literature of the great American road trip, including prose, poetry, films, and photography. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own stories, and considering the ways in which our personal journeys have come to inform and define our lives. The course includes a number of campus-wide field trips, and an end-of-quarter road trip down the California coast. NOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
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