2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

11 - 20 of 492 results for: all courses

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 305B, DLCL 123)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy either the Ways-Creative Expression requirement or Ways-Engaging Difference. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 HISTORY 115D Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 counts for DLCL 123.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ARTSINST 100: The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (APPPHYS 100)

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

ARTSINST 142: Drawing with Code (ARTSTUDI 163)

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSINST 150G: Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality (CSRE 150G, CSRE 350G, FEMGEN 150G, LIFE 150G, TAPS 150G)

In this theory and practice-based course, students will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performances in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection about a live performance event on campus are required. Students will also learn various meditation practices as tools for making and critiquing performance, in both our seminar discussions and performance workshops. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well as in relation to the works studied. We will also consider the ethics and current debates concerning the mindfulness industry. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, Renee Cox, William Pope.L, Cassils, boychild, Curious, Adrian Piper, Xandra Ibarra, Valérie Reding, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ana Mendieta.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Otalvaro, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 19N: An Artist's Life: Diverse Voices and Changing Contexts

This course is designed for students considering an Art Practice minor or major. In this course, students gain confidence and experience connecting to their artistic voices as we explore the myriad possible career paths artists take to build sustainable careers. The course consists of a series of studio projects, each centered around a different artist whose career and art practice we study. The example artists will be primarily artists of color, or artists from communities which are underrepresented in the art world, with practices and careers ranging from the conventional to the more unusual. The goal of these artist selections is to model the possibilities of an art career for students who do not easily see themselves well represented in the mainstream art world, while also broadening all students¿ understanding of the many different methods for making work and practicing as an artist today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 131: Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 136: The Portable Studio

With a decrease in available real estate and an increase in virtual real estate via the Internet and new technologies, contemporary artists are developing new means of creative production that do not necessarily require the use of a traditional art studio. This interdisciplinary course follows this line of thought and will function as a means to explore systems of art-making through nomadic practices outside of the traditional art studio. The overall goal of this course is to challenge students to think differently about the nature of studio practice, where they will explore themes of public versus private, and physical versus virtual space through the creation of time-based artwork. By way of lectures, readings, and class assignments students will be introduced to sound, video, social practice, and performance art that will be developed and presented though unconventional means with an emphasis on site. No previous experience required.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 139: Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints