2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

151 - 160 of 342 results for: all courses

FILMPROD 103: Adaptation

A close analysis of film adaptation, using various source materials to examine the demands form makes on content and the creative choices made in adaptation to film. Source materials will include plays, fiction, biography, history, graphic novels, and reference to video games and amusement park rides. A weekly film screening is a requirement of the course.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

FILMPROD 106: Image and Sound: Filmmaking for the Digital Age

Despite the rise of emerging forms like two-minute YouTube videos, six second Vines, or interactive storytelling modules, many core principles of visual storytelling remain unchanged. In this hands-on film production class students will learn a broad set of filmmaking fundamentals (basic history, theory, and practice) and will apply them creating film projects using tools such as iPhones, consumer cameras and FCPX.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

FILMPROD 114: Introduction to Film and Video Production

Hands-on. Techniques of film and video making including conceptualization, visualization, story structure, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Priority to junior/senior Film & Media Studies majors.Admission determined on the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

FRENCH 166: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course need to email Professors Galvez and Rodin (mailto:mgalvez@stanford.edu and mailto:jrodin@stanford.edu) with a statement of intent and dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

GERMAN 128: Writing with Kafka (GERMAN 328)

This course explores Franz Kafka his literary work and biography, its themes and his contemporary significance through an array of heterogeneous materials and creative practices. Discussions of Kafka's short writings, correspondences and diary entries; feuilletons about Kafka, film and radio adaptations of his works. Exploring ways to make Krafka's creativity productive for their writing, students may study topics such as questions of textual criticism, humor, parody, the uncanny and the Kafkaesque in Kafka and today. Throughout, the seminar will tease out historical and cultural backgrounds of Kafka's work and life, and trace the crisis of modernity in his writings. Readings, discussions and writing creative projects and analytical writing in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

HISTORY 50N: Who Killed Jane Stanford... The Podcast

In 1905 Jane Stanford died of strychnine poisoning. Who may have killed her remains unknown. For this seminar, you will become collaborative historians and journalists to research the case and create investigative audio podcast much like WBEZ Serial. Building on research by a previous freshman seminary, you will together you will examine suspects, circumstances, and the often odd actions of central figures and then build an audio story out of interviews, archival materials, and sound recordings. In your (application?) explain your interest, and any experience with, podcasting.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ILAC 107N: 3D Modeling, Virtual Media, and the Poetics of the Self: The Art and Lives of Fernando Pessoa

Preference to freshmen. The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa, Portugal'€™s greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work (in Portuguese and English) as for his complex understanding of selfhood (he would divide his own subjectivity into 106 different, autonomous selves), Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa'€™s work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, art, and the self. Class field trip to San Francisco. Written assignments include a journal, blog posts, and a final paper written as someone else. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 108N: Masterpieces: García Márquez

Extensive and detailed reading of the major works and a selection of the most significant critical texts about the author. Secondary readings by Vargas Llosa, Ludmer, Moretti, and Bloom. Topics include: macondismo, magical realism, canonicity, representations of violence, and autobiography.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints