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241 - 250 of 486 results for: all courses

HISTORY 255D: Racial Identity in the American Imagination (AFRICAAM 255, AMSTUD 255D, CSRE 255D, HISTORY 355D)

From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, this course explores the ways that racial identity has been experienced, represented and contested throughout American history. Engaging historical, legal and literary texts and films, this course examines major historical transformations that have shaped our understanding of racial identity. This course also draws on other imaginative modes including autobiography, memoir, photography and music to consider the ways that racial identity has been represented in American society. Most broadly, this course interrogates the problem of American identity and examines the interplay between racial identity and American identity. This course moves along both chronological and thematic axes to investigate the problems of racial mixture, mixed-race identity, racial passing and racial performance across historical periods. Themes of ambiguous, hidden and hybrid identity will be critical to this course. This course will also explore the interplay of the problems of class, gender and sexuality in the construction of racial identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 259A: Poverty and Homelessness in America

Service learning. Students participate in a two quarter internship at a local shelter for homeless individuals or families. Readings include historical, social science, and social commentary literature. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 261: Race, Gender, and Class in Jim Crow America

How African American life and labor were redefined from 1890-1954. Topics include family life, work, leisure patterns, transnational relations, cultural expressions emphasizing literature and music, resistance and social activisim. Primary sources including visual materials, literature, and film; historical interpretations of the period.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 265: Writing Asian American History (AMSTUD 265, ASNAMST 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

HISTORY 281A: Twentieth-Century Iraq: A Political and Social History

The colonial experience, creation of the modern Iraqi state, and transition to military dictatorship. Political movements, religious and tribal elements, and their relation to the state. Geopolitical context.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 281B: Modern Egypt (HISTORY 381B)

From the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Topics: European imperialism, the political economy of cotton, rise of nationalism, gender and the nation, minorities, the coup of 1952, positive neutralism and the Cold War, and the neo-liberal reconstruction of Egypt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Prakash, A. (PI)

HISTORY 282: The United States and the Middle East since 1945 (HISTORY 382)

Since the end of WW II, U.S. interests in the Middle East have traditionally been defined as access to oil at a reasonable price, trade and markets, containing the influence of the Soviet Union, and the security of Israel. Is this the full range of U.S. interests? How has the pursuit of these interests changed over time? What forces have shaped U.S. policy? What is the impact of U.S. policy on the region itself?
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
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