2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

71 - 80 of 160 results for: all courses

HISTORY 96: Gandhi in His Times and Ours

Place the paradox of Gandhi in context of global convulsions of 20th century. Gandhi lived across continents; maturing in South Africa, struggling in India, attaining celebrity in Europe. As leader of masses, his method of Satyagraha was distinctively at odds with his times. Yet, he also privileged sacrifice, dying, even euthanasia. In a world beset by fear and war, Gandhi's complex theory of nonviolence is compelling. What kind of nonviolent politics did Gandhi envision after Fascism, Auschwitz, Hiroshima, and Pakistan?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 196: Gandhi in His Times and Ours

(Same as HISTORY 96. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 196.) Place the paradox of Gandhi in context of global convulsions of 20th century. Gandhi lived across continents; maturing in South Africa, struggling in India, attaining celebrity in Europe. As leader of masses, his method of Satyagraha was distinctively at odds with his times. Yet, he also privileged sacrifice, dying, even euthanasia. In a world beset by fear and war, Gandhi's complex theory of nonviolence is compelling. What kind of nonviolent politics did Gandhi envision after Fascism, Auschwitz, Hiroshima, and Pakistan?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ER, WAY-SI

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 278S: The Ethical Challenges of Climate Change (HISTORY 478)

This course explores the ethical challenges of climate change from historical, social, economic, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. These include the discovery of global warming over two centuries, the rise of secular and religious denialism and skepticism toward the scientific consensus on it, the dispute between developed and developing countries over how to forge a binding global agreement to mitigate it, and the "role morality" of various actors (scientists, politicians, fossil fuel companies, the media and ordinary individuals) in the US in assessing ethical responsibility for the problem and its solutions.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI

HISTORY 293D: Global Intellectual History (HISTORY 393D)

Ideas have circulated globally for millennia but relatively recently have thinkers begun to conceptualize the global. Like "humanity" and "universalism," or what Marx called "international," the "global" too has complex genealogies. It is associated, often simultaneously, with empire and freedom, war and equality, commitment and treason, piracy and justice, homelessness and cosmopolitanism. Working with key 20th century texts from Italy, Britain, India, Israel, Palestine, Germany, France, and Algeria, course explores how thinking "globally" impacts the very foundations of modern political thought.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 74: Ethics in a Human Life (PHIL 74A)

Ethical questions pervade a human life from before a person is conceived until after she dies, and at every point in between. This course raises a series of ethical questions, following along the path of a person's life - questions that arise before, during, and after she lives it. We will explore distinctive questions that a life presents at each of several familiar stages: prior to birth, childhood, adulthood, death, and even beyond. We will consider how some philosophers have tried to answer these questions, and we will think about how answering them might help us form a better understanding of the ethical shape of a human life as a whole.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER

HUMBIO 174: Foundations of Bioethics

Classic articles, legal cases, and foundational concepts. Theoretical approaches derived from philosophy. The ethics of medicine and research on human subjects, assisted reproductive technologies, genetics, cloning, and stem cell research. Ethical issues at the end of life. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
Instructors: Magnus, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 175H: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 175L: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints