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271 - 280 of 331 results for: all courses

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91EP: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (EARTHSYS 154)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Savelson, K. (PI)

RELIGST 21: Religion in Science Fiction and Fantasy

Science fiction and fantasy create alternate worlds that incorporate religious institutions and beliefs that illuminate how we think about religion now and for the future. Texts work off diverse religious traditions: Islam, Buddhism, Catholic and Protestant forms of Christianity, Mayan religion, and Voudou are some that appear. Themes of free will and determinism, immortality, apocalypse and redemption. Myth, ritual, prophecy, the messianic hero, monasticism and mysticism. Texts like Dune, Count Zero, Sandman, Grass and the like explore religion in the contemporary imagination. Main assignment: write a short story.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

SINY 114: Writing in the City

The craft of fiction writing and introduction to the literary culture of New York. Writing exercises will tune students¿ senses to the rhythms of New York. Students produce their own short stories, which will be examined in workshop discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Orringer, J. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 15SC: Courtroom Theater

In the new millennium, the popularity of TV courtroom drama has been staggering: according to a weekly Nielsen ratings conducted a few years ago, 30 million people watched CSI: Crime Scene Investigation in one night, 70 million watched at least one of the CSI shows, and 40 million watched two other forensic dramas ( Without a Traceand Cold Case). These widely popular shows offer a somewhat distorted image of American criminal courtroom. In this class we will go "behind the scenes" to engage in a hands-on investigation of performances in the criminal trials. nWe will begin by visiting Bay Area courthouses to investigate the courtroom as a "set" for powerful legal dramas that are happening there on a daily basis. In these field trips we will also observe the courtroom proceedings and talk to judges and other legal professionals. After this introduction to the real-life courtroom, we will investigate landmark theatrical court dramas. Using mock trial techniques, we will approach playtexts as legal "cases." We will try to identify weaknesses and strengths of these cases, and then use them as mock trial scenarios. Ultimately, this class engages the questions of what does it take to build a solid courtroom case and how does it differ from a powerful piece of theater. While getting acquainted with both courtroom and theater techniques, we will keep a critical eye on (mis)representations of criminal courtroom in the popular media. No previous experience in acting or mock trials is necessary. The class satisfies the WAYS Creative Expression requirement. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 16AX: Personal Narrative: Crafting Performances from the Material of Your Life

In Personal Narrative, students will gain their own rigorous training in storytelling techniques, while both engaging in the New York theater community's deep and rich reservoir of personal storytellers and exploring the ways in which stories from their own lives can become powerful performances. Seminar discussions inspired by encounters with other artists' approaches to storytelling will set the stage for guided technical exercises, which will in turn introduce new questions for reading and analysis. In addition to readings, viewings, field trips, and exercise participation, students will be keep a journal reflecting on each day's work and the process of creating their personal narrative pieces. The Intensive will culminate in 1) a performance showcasing the original, fully crafted personal stories of all the participants, 2) the written text of each student's piece for future development, and 3) a short essay reflecting on the process of developing a personal narrative performance and critically assessing the different tools, techniques, and influences that helped in that journey.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Taubman, G. (PI)
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