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151 - 160 of 331 results for: all courses

ILAC 239: Borges and Translation (DLCL 239)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge -- history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law -- by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one's perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ME 12AX: Painting Engaging Stories

This course is an introduction to the practice of fine art as the catalyst for engaging in your everyday story. Using watercolor techniques students will investigate how the practice of fine art enhances your capacity to refocus and amplifies your ability to engage in the artistic expression of your story and the stories around you.

nDiscover how to apply painting techniques to make your observations and reflections a daily commitment through the studio driven methods of art and psychology. This course is designed to introduce students to multiple practices in the fine art of painting, using media such as water color, ink, and painting transfers. With an emphasis on aesthetics and the applied psychology of everyday experience, students will have the opportunity to increase their creative confidence. Work is designed to enhance your attention and sensory appreciation to everyday experiences, in-class and during short field trips.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment. Attend the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE

ME 103Q: Product Realization: Making is Thinking

Product Realization encompasses those processes required to transform a concept into the creation of a functional, useful, and beautiful product. In this project-based seminar, students develop product realization confidence and intuition using the rich array of tools available in the Product Realization Lab as well as industry-standard design engineering software programs and course readings in design/realization philosophy. Interactions with the Stanford design engineering community as well as field trips to iconic Bay area design engineering firms round out students' experience. Learning Goals: Build confidence in transforming concepts into products through foundational texts and rigorous exercises, master integrated design/realization software and tools through hands-on learning and practice, and engage with the Stanford design engineering community on campus and well beyond.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 10AX: Science of Sound

Science of Sound will explore sound and sound-related technology from the perspectives of mathematics, physics, and acoustics. Scientists and engineers will have a chance to apply their technical knowledge to the field of music while musicians will learn how sound behaves physically and how it can be recorded, processed, and reproduced. Using the newly opened Bing Concert Hall as a focal point, we will study the science of sound recording, room acoustics, and multi-channel mixing and playback. Students will use what they learn to create short multi-channel compositions using special techniques to place sounds spatially. These pieces will be performed during the annual outdoor Summer CCRMA Transitions concert and again during the Fall 2014 CCRMA concert at Bing Concert Hall. We will use the textbook by Jay Kadis entitled Science of Sound Recording as our primary text and incorporate plenty of hands-on experience with sound equipment and electronics.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 11A: Orchestral Repertoire and Technique for Violin

Open to major and non-majors who would like to learn orchestral pieces and performance technique, including the works from the Stanford Symphony Orchestra's concert program. Priority is given to students who sign up for SSO and SPO. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 12A: Introductory Piano Class

"(A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3)There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information.Class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Preference to department majors. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Zerlang, T. (PI)
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