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141 - 150 of 331 results for: all courses

FILMPROD 114: Introduction to Film and Video Production

Hands-on. Techniques of film and video making including conceptualization, visualization, story structure, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Priority to junior/senior Film & Media Studies majors.Admission determined on the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

FRENCH 151: Performing the Middle Ages (DLCL 121)

Through an analysis of medieval love, satirical and Crusade lyrics in the Old Occitan, Old French, and Galician-Portuguese traditions, we will study deictic address, corporeal subjectivity, the female voice, love debates, and the body as a figure of political conflict. Special attention will be given to the transmission of vernacular song from live performance to manuscripts. Authors include Ovid, Bernart de Ventadorn, Bertran de Born, La Comtessa de Dia, Thibaut de Champagne, Dante, and Pound. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

GERMAN 41N: Inventing Modern Theatre: Georg Büchner and Frank Wedekind (TAPS 41N)

The German writers Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). Many of the most important theater and film directors of the last century, including Max Reinhardt, G. W. Pabst, Orson Welles, Robert Wilson, and Werner Herzog, have wrestled with their works, as have composers and writers from Alban Berg and Bertolt Brecht through Christa Wolf and Thalia Field. Rock artists as diverse as Tom Waits, Lou Reed, Duncan Sheik, and Metallica have recently rediscovered their urgency. Reading these works in translation and examining artistic creations they inspired. Classroom discussions and written responses; students also rehearse and present in-class performances of excerpts from the plays. The aim of these performances is not to produce polished stagings but to creatively engage with the texts and their interpretive traditions. No previous theatrical experience required.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

GERMAN 166: Who were the Vikings? (ENGLISH 166)

Who were the Vikings and what has been their influence on contemporary culture? This course provides a broad introduction to Viking society and culture as well as to their legacy in the modern world. We will look at Viking life, mythology, literature, art and archaeology as well as modern adaptations of Viking culture in music, literature, film and television. We will read some of the great works of Viking literature ¿ tales of Odin and Thor, of magic and monsters, of adventures across the seas - and examine online exhibitions of Vikings artefacts and settlements in Europe and Newfoundland. During the first half of the course, students will begin thinking about their final project ¿ a creative reimagining one of the texts or artefacts which we will discuss in class. The latter half of the course will focus on the development of the Vikings as a cultural model for modern creative expression. We will investigate how Norse themes, characters and forms were adapted in Germany, England and the USA in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by writers, artists and composers such as Richard Wagner, William Morris, Henry Longfellow and J.R.R. Tolkien. The course will conclude with a discussion of how the Vikings (and Viking ideas) are represented today in popular culture, including the 1958 Kirk Douglas film, ¿the Vikings¿, the TV shows ¿The Vikings¿ and ¿Game of Thrones¿ and the Marvel comic books series. Students will be encouraged to examine the ways in which these texts engage with their historical models and consider how this might influence their own creative project.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

HISTORY 50N: Who Killed Jane Stanford?

In 1905 Jane Stanford died of strychnine poisoning. Who may have killed her remains unknown. You will, in effect, be a grand jury. Like most of your real life intellectual work, the class will be collaborative. Together you will identify suspects and examine the often odd actions of central figures in the case: her personal secretary, physicians, and David Starr Jordan, the president of Stanford.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ILAC 107N: 3D Modeling, Virtual Media, and the Poetics of the Self: The Art and Lives of Fernando Pessoa

Preference to freshmen. The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa, Portugal'€™s greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work (in Portuguese and English) as for his complex understanding of selfhood (he would divide his own subjectivity into 106 different, autonomous selves), Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa'€™s work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, art, and the self. Class field trip to San Francisco. Written assignments include a journal, blog posts, and a final paper written as someone else. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 108N: Masterpieces: García Márquez

Extensive and detailed reading of the major works and a selection of the most significant critical texts about the author. Secondary readings by Vargas Llosa, Ludmer, Moretti, and Bloom. Topics include: macondismo, magical realism, canonicity, representations of violence, and autobiography.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)
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