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221 - 230 of 395 results for: all courses

INTNLREL 102: History of the International System since 1914 (HISTORY 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenges of climate change, inequality, migration, and terrorism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dovern, L. (PI)

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110C.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 110D for 5 units. International Relations majors taking this course should enroll in INTNLREL 110D for 5 units. SCPD students should enroll for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 143: State and Society in Korea (SOC 111, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

JAPAN 197: Points in Japanese Grammar (JAPAN 297)

(Formerly JAPANLIT157/257) The course provides practical but in-depth analyses of selected points in Japanese grammar that are often difficult to acquire within the limited hours of language courses. We consider findings from linguistic research, focusing on differences between similar expressions and distinctions that may not be salient in English, with the aim to provide systematic analytical background for more advanced understanding of the language. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG23 or equivalent for JAPAN197; JAPANLNG103 or equivalent for JAPAN297.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Repeatable for credit

JEWISHST 4N: A World History of Genocide (HISTORY 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 282: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This introductory-level course is targeted to students with no linguistics background.  The course is designed to introduce and provide an overview of methods, findings, and problems in eight main areas of linguistics: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, Psycholinguistics, and Sociolinguistics. Through lectures, in-class activities, and problem sets, you will come away with an overview of various linguistic phenomena, a sense of the diversity across languages, skills of linguistic analysis, an awareness of connections between these linguistics and applications of linguistics more broadly, and a basis for understanding the systematic, but complex nature of human language.  While much of the course uses English to illuminate various points, you will be exposed to and learn to analyze languages other than English.  By the end of the course, you should be able to explain similarities and differences of human languages, use basic linguistic terminology appropriately, apply the tools of linguistic analysis to problems and puzzles of linguistics, understand the questions that drive much research in linguistics, and explain how understanding linguistics is relevant for a variety of real-world phenomena.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 5N: What's Your Accent? Investigations in Acoustic Phonetics

Preference to freshmen. Phonetic variation across accents of English; experimental design; practical experience examining accents of seminar participants; acoustic analysis of speech using Praat.
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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