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751 - 760 of 831 results for: all courses

SINY 148: Grappling with the Global: Gentrification, Immigration, and Sustainability in New York City

This course will examine the impacts of gentrification, immigration, and global environmental concerns on place-making in New York City, deploying ethnographic fieldwork and first-hand accounts of everyday urban life as tools to document and understand urban change.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SINY 154: Improvised Music in New York City: 1959-2019

This course will introduce you to the sounds and practices of improvised music and to some of today's key improvising musicians who live and work in New York City.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

SINY 158: Mapping the Infinite City: Exploring New York's Immigrant Worlds

With field-trips allied to visits from the experts whose work is featured in Nonstop Metropolis¿linguists and demographers, activists and artists, scholars of race and of history¿this course will open our eyes to the splendid feast of the city's immigrant neighborhoods, the ¿gorgeous mosaic,¿ and explore the complex issues involved in immigration and city life. We will investigate the many ways that ¿a sense of place,¿ even in our globalizing age, remains crucial to residents of the city's neighborhoods¿and to all people everywhere.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

SINY 168: Safe Cities: A Study of Institutional Responses to Gender Based Violence in the Global City

The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexua more »
The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexual assault, sex work, trafficking and the rights of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.n nThe latter section will require engagement with actors that are instrumental in responding to and preventing gender based violence, and may include, Victor Madrigal-Borloz the UN Independent Expert on Protection against Violence and Discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, Sgt. Greg Accomando of the NYPD Special Victim's Division, Abagail Nelson the Senior Vice President for Programs at Episcopal Relief & Development, and Deborah Hayashi of the North Central Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team. n nThrough these frameworks and studies, the course offers a well-rounded introduction to the complexity of interventions against gender based discrimination in the context of a Global City. The transnational scope of the course is anchored by New York City as an incubator and instigator for innovative interventions against gender inequality, and there will be an emphasis on the cross-pollination that occurs between the City, State and national and international NGO platforms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SIW 107: Civil Rights Law

This course analyzes the major civil rights laws that Congress has enacted since the 1960s, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Fair Housing Act, the Public Accommodations ACt, the AGe Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The course provides an in-depth study of the statutory language of each of these laws, examines how courts have interpreted the statutes, and explores the policy arguments in favor and against such laws. The course also reviews the history context surrounding the enactment of these statutes, including an examination of the civil rights movement as a political and social force.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

SLAVIC 183: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SLE 93: Structured Liberal Education

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Du Bois, Eliot, Woolf, Kafka, Brecht, Vertov, Beauvoir, Sartre, Fanon, Gandhi, and Morrison.
Terms: Spr | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-3, THINK, WAY-ED, Writing SLE

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 3: America: Unequal (CSRE 3P, PUBLPOL 113)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (CSRE 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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