2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

661 - 670 of 822 results for: all courses

OSPPARIS 77: Literature and Philosophy of Place

Themes of place and displacement in literature and philosophy of the larger French-speaking world, focusing on diasporic writers. Paris as a magnet for artists and thinkers seeking freedom from restrictive environments. Contrast the experiences of characters who are at "home" and those who are "away," the anxieties of exile and of colonialism, how one person's claim on home can be another's experience of being invaded,. Philosophers' analyses of the interdependence of place and identity, place and belonging, the sometimes contradictory nature of 'home,' as they pertain to the literary (fiction, essay, poetry) texts we will read.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPPARIS 80: The Body, Race, and Difference in Contemporary France

Using anthropological frames, students will learn to think about the body and its role in everyday life, paying particular attention to the ways that ethnicity, citizenship, race and belonging are lived and experienced in contemporary France. We will work with materials ranging from the colonial collection of human remains that were used to represent French Universalism in museum projects, to cultural artifacts acquired during the colonization of Africa (their circulation and the current debates around them), to interactive ethnographic work with current social organizations centered around the body, rights and health. Broad questions pivot on two fundamental queries: Is the differentiated body a natural fact? When and how have ethnic and multicultural discourses come into play in the cultural context of France where the political categorization of race is legally forbidden?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPPARIS 186F: Contemporary African Literature in French

Focus is on African writers and those of the diaspora, bound together by a common history of slave trade, bondage, colonization, and racism. Their works belong to the past, seeking to save an oral heritage of proverbs, story tales, and epics, but they are also contemporary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Leca, F. (PI)

OSPSANTG 14: Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century

Key figures in poetry, narrative fiction, theater, and testimonio, such as Mistral, Garro, Lispector, Poniatowska, Valenzuela, Eltit and Menchú. Close reading technique. Issues raised in literary texts that reflect the evolution of the condition of women in Latin America during the period. Topics include gender differences and relationships, tradition versus transgression, relationship between changes in the status of women and other egalitarian transformations, and women writers and the configuration of literary canons.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Missana, S. (PI)

OSPSANTG 44: Introduction to Borderlands Literature of the Americas

Comparative dialogue regarding a variety of perspectives from Chicano/a and LatinAmerican literary studies. Examine autobiographies, fiction, and cultural productions from writers such as Roberto Bolaño (2666), Yuri Herrera (Señales que precederán al fin del mundo), Gloria Anzaldúa (Borderlands/La Frontera), Sara Uribe (Antígona González), Américo Paredes (The Hammon and the Beans), Sandra Cisneros (La casa en Mango), and Helena Viramontes ("The Cariboo Café"). Also focus on the Chilean dictatorship novel Nocturna de Chile by Roberto Bolaño and the Dominican dictatorship novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

OSPSANTG 118X: Artistic Expression in Latin America

Elite, mass-media, and popular cultural changes in Chile under conditions of economic and political liberalization. The reception of cultural meanings from the center of the world social system (U.S., EU, and Japan), reformulation to respond to local conditions, and export in the shape of cultural artifacts. Innovative elements rooted in the regional and local culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Albornoz, C. (PI)

PEDS 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping (INTNLREL 60Q)

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

How do race/ethnicity and social economic status contribute to health disparities, how are vulnerable populations uniquely at risk for poor health outcomes, and how does where we live and work influence our health status? Explore the processes through which social status and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequalities. Discuss clinical, public health and policy solutions for advancing health equity from the perspective of health professionals working in multiple sectors. Other topics include: gender, age, individual and structural bias; language, education; vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); life course; environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic, green space, housing, food access, law enforcement, and media); and innovative community-engaged and policy solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Bruce, J. (PI)

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints