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631 - 640 of 825 results for: all courses

NATIVEAM 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (ARTHIST 211, CSRE 111)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies: History, Society and Culture Down Under

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Boyer, D. (PI)

OSPBER 71: EU in Crisis

Challenges confronting Europe as a whole and the EU in particular: impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform. How the EU and its members respond and if the opportunities of these crises are constructively used for reform - or wasted (Crisis = Danger + Opportunity). Analyse institutions, interests and competing narratives to explain the current situation in Europe. Excursion to other European capital to get a non-German perspective on the crises.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bruckner, U. (PI)

OSPBER 83: Refugees and Germany

History and lived experience of refugees, both those who have fled from and to Germany, in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Visits to relevant sites in Berlin, meetings with refugees and experts on this topic, and readings to provide context. Participants write a journal; option for creative writing, either fiction or creative non-fiction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Treitel, J. (PI)

OSPBER 86: The Integration of Refugees in Europe: German Education Settings

Experiences of refugees as they enter German secondary and post-secondary education settings. Using a social-psychological lens, learn how refugees understand their experiences in German schools and interactions with native students and teachers; how they are seen and treated; barriers to better relationships and outcomes; and how these can be overcome. Learn from popular commentary reports; scholarly writings from social-psychology and related fields on diversity, bias, belonging, and psychologically "wise" interventions. Experiential learning opportunities, including conversations with refugee students and educators working with refugees.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 38: Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Adhikari, M. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 45: Transitional Justice and Transformation Debates in South Africa

Exploration of transitional justice through critical discussion of contemporary South Africa. Conflicting perspectives of the South African transition through an exploration of the creation of the "rainbow nation" as well as discussions over whether a denial of justice for apartheid-era crimes prevails. Decisions made post-apartheid over how best to confront the large-scale human rights abuses of the past, including South Africa's recent past through the lens of the "pillars" of transitional justice: truth seeking, criminal justice, reparations and institutional reform. Issues of structural violence and the legacies of apartheid in order to question to what extent we can consider South Africa to have realised the promises of its transition
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 78: Postcolonial Modernist Art Movements in Africa

Introduction to the complexities and contradictions of 'modernity' and 'modernism(s)' in postcolonial Africa. With a focus on ideology-driven interdisciplinary artistic movements in Senegal, Nigeria, Sudan, Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia and South Africa, examine various schools of thought that were part of modern consciousness that characterised the independence decades. Role that art centres, workshops, collectives and mission schools played in histories of European expansion and colonialism. Debates regarding notions of 'appropriation,' 'natural synthesis' and 'assimilation' interpreted in the context of postcolonial theory. Different modes of production and methodological approaches.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 83: From Cape to California: Settler Colonialism and the Genocide of Indigenous Peopes

Two major social and historical phenomena: genocide and settler colonialism, contextualized within the broad contours of world history as well as the making of European colonialism and Western global domination from the start of European colonial expansion in the fifteenth century to the twentieth century. Emphasis on developing global comparative perspectives focusing on southern African, North and Latin American, as well as Australian case studies. Histories of the place from which students come, California, as well as the place they currently find themselves, the Cape, and the links both have to settler colonialism and the genocidal destruction of indigenous peoples
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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