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441 - 450 of 655 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 146: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? The course will be taught in conjunction with a two unit engaged learning component which will place students in relevant settings.nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit engaged learning component
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 146D: Developmental Disabilities: From Biology to Policy (PEDS 246)

Fifteen percent of US children have disabilities. While advances in medicine and technology have increased life expectancy for these children, health care delivery, education, and public attitudes have not kept pace. Students in this course will learn the possibilities and limitations of new biomedical treatments of Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. Students will also evaluate the impact of public policy initiatives, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Americans with Disabilities Act on inclusion and participation in society. Prerequisite: HUMBIO 25SI or Human Biology Core or equivalent.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HUMBIO 162L: Psychosis and Literature (ANTHRO 82P, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

HUMBIO 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ILAC 127E: Junipero Serra (HISTORY 263D)

Why is Junipero Serra considered a representative figure of California? How have assessments of Serra evolved over the last 200 years? Why does his name appear so often on our campus? In this course we will consider these and other questions in terms of Spanish empire, Native American history, California politics of memory and commemoration, among other approachs. Requirements include weekly reading, class discussion, a field trip to Carmel Mission, short writing assignments, and a formal debate on the ethics naming university or public buildings after historical figures with contested pasts. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 140: Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film (CHILATST 140)

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an evergrowing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: El niño pez, Bolivia, Ulises, Faustino Mayta visita a su prima, Copacabana, Chico y Rita, Sin nombre, Los que se quedan, Amador, and En la puta calle. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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