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41 - 50 of 242 results for: all courses

BIOC 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 118Q: Genomics and Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Knowledge gained from sequencing human genomes and implications for medicine and biomedical research. Novel diagnoses and treatment of diseases, including stem cells, gene therapy and rational drug design. Personal genomics and how it is used to improve health and well being. Social and ethical implications of genetic information such as privacy, discrimination and insurability. Course Webpage: http://biochem118.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Brutlag, D. (PI)

BIOE 41: Physical Biology of Macromolecules

Principles of statistical physics, thermodynamics, and kinetics with applications to molecular biology. Topics include entropy, temperature, chemical forces, enzyme kinetics, free energy and its uses, self assembly, cooperative transitions in macromolecules, molecular machines, feedback, and accurate replication. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CHEM 31A, B (or 31X); strongly recommended: PHYSICS 41, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOE 42: Physical Biology of Cells

Principles of transport, continuum mechanics, and fluids, with applications to cell biology. Topics include random walks, diffusion, Langevin dynamics, transport theory, low Reynolds number flow, and beam theory, with applications including quantitative models of protein trafficking in the cell, mechanics of the cell cytoskeleton, the effects of molecular noise in development, the electromagnetics of nerve impulses, and an introduction to cardiovascular fluid flow. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CHEM 31A, B (or 31X); strongly recommended: CS 106A, PHYSICS 41, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval. 4 units, Spr (Huang, K)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOE 44: Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab

Introduction to next-generation techniques in genetic, molecular, biochemical, and cellular engineering. Lab modules build upon current research including: gene and genome engineering via decoupled design and construction of genetic material; component engineering focusing on molecular design and quantitative analysis of experiments; device and system engineering using abstracted genetically encoded objects; and product development based on useful applications of biological technologies. Concurrent or previous enrollment in BIO 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics.  Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs.  Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 41, 42
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOE 103B: Systems Physiology and Design

*ONLINE Offering of BIOE103. This pilot class, BIOE103B, is an entirely online offering with the same content, learning goals, and prerequisites as BIOE103. Students attend class by watching videos and completing assignments remotely. Students may attend recitation and office hours in person, but cannot attend the BIOE103 in-person lecture due to room capacity restraints.* Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs. Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CME 102; PHY 41; BIO 41, 42; strongly recommended PHY 43; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOE 123: Biomedical System Prototyping Lab

The Bioengineering System Prototyping Laboratory is a fast-paced, team-based system engineering experience, in which teams of 2-3 students design and build a fermenter that meets a set of common requirements along with a set of unique team-determined requirements. Students learn-by-doing hands-on skills in electronics and mechanical design and fabrication. Teams also develop process skills and an engineering mindset by aligning specifications with requirements, developing output metrics and measuring performance, and creating project proposals and plans. The course culminates in demonstration of a fully functioning fermenter that meets the teams' self-determined metrics.nnLearning goals:n1. Hands-on skills and experience with design, fabrication, integration, and characterization of practical electronic and mechanical hardware systems relevant to Bioengineeringn2. Practice using modern rapid prototyping and device equipment and techniques, including CAD, 3D printing, laser cutting, microcontrollers, design thinkingn3. Experience working as a team to build an end-to-end functional biomedical system (e.g., a fermenter)nnPrerequisites: BIOE 41 and Matlab recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 44Y: Core Laboratory in Plant Biology, Ecology and Evolution

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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