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BIO 33N: Conservation Science and Practice

Preference to freshmen. This course will explore the potential for harmonizing people and nature, for achieving improved outcomes in the well-being of both as a result of conservation investments and interventions. We will consider biophysical, economic, social, and psychological perspectives, examining an array of conservation goals, from protecting endangered species to securing ecosystem services (such as flood control and climate stability) to alleviating poverty and improving mental well-being. We will also study the design and implementation of real conservation and human development efforts worldwide, among the many farmers, ranchers, fishing people, and others managing Earth's lands and waters. Highlights include a field trip to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford¿s very own nature reserve, and guest visits of some impressive conservation leaders internationally.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Daily, G. (PI)

BIO 41: Genetics, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology

Emphasis is on macromolecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids) and how their structure relates to function and higher order assembly; molecular biology, genome structure and dynamics, gene expression from transcription to translation. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 42: Cell Biology and Animal Physiology

Cell structure and function; principles of animal physiology (immunology, renal, cardiovascular, sensory, motor physiology, and endocrinology); neurobiology from cellular basis to neural regulation of physiology. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: BIO 41; CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 43: Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Principles of evolution: macro- and microevolution and population genetics. Ecology: the principles underlying the exchanges of mass and energy between organisms and their environments; population, community, and ecosystem ecology; populations, evolution, and global change. Equivalent to BIOHOPK 43. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: BIO 41, 42; CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 44X: Core Molecular Biology Laboratory

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as a tumor suppressor through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of wild type and mutant p53 proteins. Formulate a testable hypothesis and assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, formulate further analyses to determine whether mutant p53 is present in the cell, can bind to DNA, and/or can enter the nucleus. Conduct lab experiments, present findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X, or 31A,B, and 33; concurrent or past enrollment in Biology or Human Biology core. 44X,Y should be taken sequentially in the same year, preferably as sophomores, to prepare for internships. Preference given to juniors and seniors in fall quarter, preference given to sophomores in winter quarter. Prerequisite: BIO 41. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 44Y: Core Plant Biology & Eco Evo Laboratory

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and finally writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course will focus on the ecology of oak regeneration at Stanford's nearby Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Students, working in teams, will develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. The capstone of the course will be an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs will be completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIOC 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 110: Chromatin Regulation of the Genome (BIO 210)

Maintenance of the genome is a prerequisite for life. In eukaryotes, all DNA-templated processes are tightly connected to chromatin structure and function. This course will explore epigenetic and chromatin regulation of cellular processes related to aging, cancer, stem cell pluripotency, metabolic homeostasis, and development. Course material integrates current literature with a foundational review of histone modifications and nucleosome composition in epigenetic inheritance, transcription, replication, cell division and DNA damage responses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 115: The hidden kingdom - evolution, ecology and diversity of fungi (BIO 239)

Fungi are critical, yet often hidden, components of the biosphere. They regulate decomposition, are primary partners in plant symbiosis and strongly impact agriculture and economics. Students will explore the fascinating world of fungal biology, ecology and evolution via lecture, lab, field exercises and Saturday field trips that will provide traditional and molecular experiences in the collection, analysis and industrial use of diverse fungi. Students will chose an environmental niche, collect and identify resident fungi, and hypothesize about their community relationship. Prerequisite: Bio 43 recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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