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11 - 20 of 242 results for: all courses

BIO 2N: Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease in a Changing World

This seminar will explore the ways in which anthropogenic change, climate change, habitat destruction, land use change, and species invasions effects the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases. Topics will include infectious diseases of humans, wildlife, livestock, and crops, effects of disease on threatened species, disease spillover, emerging diseases, and the role of disease in natural systems. Course will be taught through a combination of popular and scientific readings, discussion, and lecture. .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mordecai, E. (PI)

BIO 7S: Introduction to Biology

Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 14: Bio-logging and Bio-telemetry

Bio-logging is a rapidly growing discipline that includes diverse fields such as consumer electronics, medicine, and marine biology. The use of animal-attached digital tags is a powerful approach to study the movement and ecology of individuals over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. This course is an introduction to bio-logging methods and analysis. Using whales as a model system, students will learn how use multi-sensor tags to study behavioral biomechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIO 15N: Environmental Literacy

Preference to freshmen. Lack of public understanding of the details of most environmental problems is cited as a cause of environmental deterioration. Good citizenship requires literacy about the elements of the scientific and decision making processes that accompany most environmental issues. Whether we are aware of them or not, environmental problems significantly decrease the quality of our lives, those of future generations and of other species. For example, when the average global temperature increases to 2oC (3.6oF) above natural, as many as 400,000 species could go extinct, and definitely some of those species, such as pollinators, currently enhance our quality of life greatly. Your grandchildren may need to learn to survive in a qualitatively different world than the one we know today.nIn this class we will explore many of the major problems our world is facing today including: over population, over consumption, sustainability impediments, toxins and pollution, and climate change. In addition, we will explore policies or lack thereof, communication missteps and breakdowns, and the role of the media to educate yet they often cause confusion.nEach week we will read articles¿mainly from the scientific literature, but also some from the policy world¿and discuss them in class.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 25Q: The Molecular Basis of Genetic Disease

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on two genetic diseases resulting from the production of protein molecules that are unable to fold into their native conformations, called conformational diseases: cystic fibrosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disease. Hypotheses and controversies surrounding the molecular basis of these disorders, and implications for novel therapeutics. Readings from research literature.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 26N: Maintenance of the Genome

Preference to freshmen. The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to the genomic DNA molecules in all living cells. Multiple strategies have evolved to prevent the deleterious consequences from endogenous DNA alterations and damage from radiation or genotoxic chemicals in the environment. In this seminar you will learn about the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. Deficiencies in DNA repair have been implicated in many hereditary diseases involving developmental defects, premature aging, and/or predisposition to cancer. An understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is important for advances in the fields of cancer biology, neurobiology, and gerontology. Background readings, introductory lectures, student presentations, short term paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hanawalt, P. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone (EARTHSYS 30)

Everything is connected, but how? Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects, mostly done in groups. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes involving bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 30N: Extinctions in Near Time: Biodiversity loss since the Pleistocene

The transition 11,700 years ago from the Pleistocene glacial period into the Holocene interglacial witnessed the expansion of humans around the world, climatic warming and the demise of many large vertebrate species. Since that time extinctions have continued on land and in the sea, culminating with the biodiversity crisis we are experiencing today. We will explore these prehistoric extinctions: "Who? When? Where? and Why?" in order to learn more about our planet's future.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

BIO 32Q: Neuroethology: The Neural Control of Behavior (HUMBIO 91Q)

Preference to sophomores. Animal behavior offers insights about evolutionary adaptations and this seminar will discuss the origins of the study of animal behavior and its development to the present. How does the nervous system control behavior and how is it changed by behavior? We will analyze and discuss original research papers about the neural basis of behavior. The use and misuse of parallels between animal and human behavior. Possible field trip to observe animals in their natural habitat.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Fernald, R. (PI)
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