2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

451 - 460 of 474 results for: all courses

SOC 46N: Race, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities

Preference to freshmen. How new identities are created and legitimated. What does it mean to try on a different identity? National groups and ethnic groups are so large that one individual can know only an infinitesimal fraction of other group members. What explains the seeming coherence of groups? If identities are a product of the imagination, why are people willing to fight and die for them? Enrollment limited to 16.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 119: Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s (SOC 219)

The demographic, economic, political, and cultural roots of social change in the 60s; its legacy in the present U.S.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 125: Sociology of Religion

The social patterns of religious belief and practice, and the classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding these patterns. Topics: churches, sects and cults, sources of religious pluralism, relationships between religion and aspects of social structures including the economy, class structure, ethnicity, social networks, and the state.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 127: Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction (SOC 227)

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (NATIVEAM 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

SOC 150: Race and Political Sociology (CSRE 150, SOC 250)

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 161: The Social Science of Entrepreneurship (SOC 261)

(Graduate students register for 261.) Who is likely to become an entrepreneur and where is entrepreneurship likely to occur? Classic and contemporary theory and research. Interaction with expert practitioners in creating entrepreneurial opportunities including venture and corporate capitalists. The role of culture, markets, hierarchies, and networks. Market creation and change, and factors that affect success of new organizations. Field projects on entrepreneurial environments such as technology licensing offices, entrepreneurial development organizations, venture capital firms, and corporate venturing groups.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

STS 1: The Public Life of Science and Technology

Focus on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments through STS interdisciplinary lens that encompasses historical dimensions (e.g., legacy of scientific revolution); technological impact (e.g., affordances of new tools and media); economic and management aspects (e.g., business models, design and engineering strategies); legal and ethical elements (e.g., intellectual property, social justice); and societal response and participation (e.g., media coverage, forms of activism). Discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

STS 160Q: Technology in Contemporary Society

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to the STS field. The natures of science and technology and their relationship, what is most distinctive about these forces today, and how they have transformed and been affected by contemporary society. Social, cultural, and ethical issues raised by recent scientific and technological developments. Case studies from areas such as information technology and biotechnology, with emphasis on the contemporary U.S. Unexpected influences of science and technology on contemporary society and how social forces shape scientific and technological enterprises and their products. Enrollment limited to 12.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SYMSYS 100: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 144, PHIL 99, PSYCH 35)

An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints