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421 - 430 of 475 results for: all courses

SOC 117A: China Under Mao (SOC 217A)

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 120: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 220)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Last offered: Autumn 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 129: Social Psychology: Self and Society (SOC 229)

Why do people behave the way they do? This fundamental question drives social psychology, a field that bridges psychology and sociology. This course surveys social psychological research on a wide variety of topics including conformity, morality, respect, generosity, identity, and prejudice, giving students a deeper understanding of the causal architecture of the social world.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Watts, A. (PI)

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 132: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 110, EDUC 310, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 135: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 235)

This course will investigate three main questions: What is poverty? What are its causes? and What do we do in the United States to alleviate it? We will examine these questions by learning about government and private nonprofit social policies. We will also explore arguments for and against those policies. Specifically, we will look at topics like hunger, housing costs, minimum wage, healthcare reform, education, welfare and other income supports. The class will be discussion based with the expectation that you come to class having completed the reading, with reflections and preliminary answers to guiding questions, your own questions in mind, and full participation in activities
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wright, R. (PI)

SOC 136: Sociology of Law (SOC 236)

(Graduate students register for 236) Major issues and debates. Topics include: historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance; the law in action versus the law on the books; organizational responses to law in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change emphasizing the American civil rights movement.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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