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PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrati more »
What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 144: Islamic Psychology (PSYC 244)

The first psychiatric hospitals in the world were established as early as the 8th century during the Islamic Golden Era. Despite the emergence of a highly sophisticated and interdisciplinary system of understanding the human psyche in early Islamic history, most students of modern psychology are unfamiliar with this rich history. This course will provide a historical and contemporary review of the Islamic intellectual heritage as it pertains to modern behavioral science and how mental illness was historically perceived and treated in the Muslim world. We will begin with a discussion of Islamic epistemology, reconcile issues such as secular vs sacred sources of knowledge and tackle the mind/body dilemma according to Islamic theology. We will then review holistic schemas of health and pathology in the Islamic religious tradition, the nature of the human being, elements of the human psyche, and principles of change leading to positive character reformation. As Stanford is the academic home of Muslim mental health research globally, we will benefit from talks by guest researchers and speakers, partake in field trips to community partners, and utilize group discussions to provide students with a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 286: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

PSYCH 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, CSRE 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

PSYCH 70: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (SOC 2)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PSYCH 75: Introduction to Cultural Psychology

The cultural sources of diversity in thinking, emotion, motivation, self, personality, morality, development, and psychopathology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. If you are interested in enrolling in this class, please fill out the following survey to be considered- https://tinyurl.com/psych103winter19. After filling out this survey, you do not need to reach out any further. In order to be fully considered for enrollment in the class, you must attend the first day of class. Enrollment will not be offered to those who are not present on the first day.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

PSYCH 165: Identity and Academic Achievement (AFRICAAM 165, CSRE 165)

How do social identities affect how people experience academic interactions? How can learning environments be better structured to support the success of all students? In this class, we will explore how a variety of identities such as race, gender, social class, and athletic participation can affect academic achievement, with the goal of identifying concrete strategies to make learning environments at Stanford and similar universities more inclusive. Readings will draw from psychology, sociology, education, and popular press. This class is a seminar format.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED

PSYCH 180: Social Psychological Perspectives on Stereotyping and Prejudice

Classic and contemporary social psychological approaches to prejudice and stereotyping. Emphasis is on how stereotypes are employed and maintained, and the influence of stereotyping and prejudice on behavior in domains including education, employment, health, and law. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Psych 1, Psych 70nInterested students should complete an application for permission at https://tinyurl.com/PSYCH180-2018 and attend the first day of class.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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