2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

121 - 130 of 815 results for: all courses

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 109A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 209A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 111: Archaeology of Gender and Sexuality (ARCHLGY 129, FEMGEN 119)

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. A majority of the world's population now live in urban areas and most of the rapid urbanization has taken place in mega-cities outside the Western world. This course explores urban cultures, identities, spatial practices and forms of urban power and imagination in Asia, Africa and Latin America.nParticipants will be introduced to a global history of urban development that demonstrates how the legacies of colonialism, modernization theory and global race thinking have shaped urban designs and urban life in most of the world. Students will also be introduced to interpretative and qualitative approaches to urban life that affords an understanding of important, if unquantifiable, vectors of urban life: stereotypes, fear, identity formations, utopia, social segregation and aspirations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 132: Religion and Politics in the Muslim World

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 133: Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender (ANTHRO 233, FEMGEN 133M)

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ANTHRO 143: Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom (ANTHRO 243)

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 186: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146, PSYC 286)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? Optional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints