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241 - 250 of 831 results for: all courses

CSRE 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132, HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Exploring and Expanding Environmental Justice in Practice (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been shaped by a limited view of the environmental justice movement, often centered on urban environmental threats and separated from other types of environmental and climate advocacy. This course will seek to expand on these discussions by exploring topics such as access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, inclusion in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, the influence of colonialism on ways of knowing, food justice and ethics, and the future of climate change policy. The course will also involve a community partnership project. In small groups students will work with an environmental organization to problem-solve around issues of equity, representation, and access. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemologies and welcome undergraduates from all disciplines. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation and commitment to community partnerships. This course requires instructor approval, please submit an application by March 16th at midnight. Application available at https://forms.gle/chBoCLX3WKSA7kBF6.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CSRE 129: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, FRENCH 129, HISTORY 235F)

"The admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, reading "Camus's fiction as an element in France's methodically constructed political geography of Algeria" for Edward Said, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor European family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from the Mediterranean world to Paris, Camus engaged in the great ethical and political battles of his time, often embracing controversial positions. Through readings and films, we will explore his multiple legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Assia Djebar, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Edward Said, Edwidge Danticat. Students will work on their production of written French, in addition to speaking French and reading comprehension. Taught in French. Students are highly encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or to successfully test above this level through the Language Center. This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

CSRE 133E: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa by reading course materials, completing writing assignments, participating in class activities, listening to contextualizing lectures, and conducting student-led presentations. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to new academic registers, vocabulary, and syntax. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of intersectional topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writ more »
This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa by reading course materials, completing writing assignments, participating in class activities, listening to contextualizing lectures, and conducting student-led presentations. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to new academic registers, vocabulary, and syntax. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of intersectional topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writers and filmmakers such as Aimé Césaire, Albert Memmi, Assia Djebar, Dani Laferrière, Djibril Tamsir Niane, Fatou Diome, Leïla Sebbar, Léopold Senghor, Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, and Ousmane Sembène. Taught in French. Students are encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or to successfully test above this level through the Language Center.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CSRE 133J: WELFARE, WORK AND POVERTY. (JEWISHST 133A, SOC 103A)

Early theorists of the welfare state described it as a reaction to the emergence of needs and interests of specific social groups during processes of economic development and change. Later theorists countered that the welfare state does not merely react to social cleavages during times of economic change but rather works to actively shape them, in line with worldviews or the interests of dominant group members. Adopting the latter approach, the goal of this course is to provide the tools and knowledge necessary for a critical evaluation of the social services provided to Israeli citizens and their impact on social and economic inequalities. The course will survey various approaches to the understanding of the goals of the welfare state. A comparative and historical account of the development of the welfare state will be presented, while highlighting recent developments, such as the increase in poverty rates and the aging of the population. During the course, we will examine the diverse needs that are served by the welfare state, as well as major dilemmas associated with the provision of services. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the development of social policies in Israel and the US.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 135: Contemporary Islam and Muslims in America (AFRICAAM 135A, AMSTUD 135X, GLOBAL 137, RELIGST 135)

In this course, we will explore contemporary Islam and Muslims in a post-9/11 and post-Trump America. Following some brief grounding history in Week 1, we will use ethnographic studies and digital media content to understand the American Muslim experience in the 21st century. Each week, we will also address how the lived experience of American Muslims interacts with "theoretical" and "normative" conceptions of Islam, and whether these interactions eventually create a distinctive "American Islam." Topics covered will include: internal and external racial & gender dynamics, ideological debates, institutions, social media wars, politics, and specific communities as case studies. Together we will develop a critical perspective on the American Muslim experience, particularly as a case of how one diverse religious community negotiates religion in a complex sociopolitical setting.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Ahmed, A. (PI)

CSRE 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

CSRE 140S: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (AFRICAAM 236B, COMPLIT 236A, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C, URBANST 140F)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial pasts, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

CSRE 141: Gentrification (AFRICAAM 241A, URBANST 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 141E: Counterstory in Literature and Education (EDUC 141, EDUC 341, LIFE 124)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)
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