2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

81 - 90 of 458 results for: all courses

BIO 140: The Science of Extreme Life of the Sea

Covers the way marine animals and plants live in extreme environments by examining morphological, ecological, and genetic adaptations to low temperature, high heat, deep water, etc. We also cover extreme lifestyles such as fast swimming, small and large body size, and novel reproductive systems. Lecture material is punctuated with a series of tutorials on narrative writing skills in science, especially creative non-fiction, memoirs, braided essays and short fiction. The goal is to integrate quantitative thinking about the life sciences with creative writing that brings facts to life. Prerequisites: core courses in biology, creative writing, environmental sciences or engineering. Two lectures back to back on Tuesdays with a Writing Intermezzo between.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Palumbi, S. (PI)

BIO 196B: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

BIO 196C: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

BIOHOPK 157H: Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 257H, ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. The trip provides a unique opportunity for students to directly engage with marine animals, coastal habitats and environmental concerns of Monterey Bay. As historian Jill Lepore writes of Rachel Carson: ¿She could not have written Silent Spring if she hadn¿t, for decades, scrambled down rocks, rolled up her pant legs, and waded into tide pools, thinking about how one thing can change another...¿ Back on campus students will complete and workshop three original nonfiction essays that explore the intersection between personal narrative and scientific curiosity. You will develop a more patient and observant eye and improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts to a general readership. **This course takes place on main campus and is open to all students. nNOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

BIOHOPK 158H: Science Meets Literature on the Monterey Peninsula (BIOHOPK 258H, ENGLISH 158H)

(Graduate students register for 258H.) This course will consider the remarkable nexus of scientific research and literature that developed on the Monterey Peninsula in the first half of the 20th century and how the two areas of creativity influenced each other. The period of focus begins with the 1932 association of John and Carol Steinbeck, Ed Ricketts, and Joseph Campbell, all of whom were highly influenced by the Carmel poet, Robinson Jeffers ¿ and ends with the novels Cannery Row (1945) and Sweet Thursday (1954). An indisputable high-tide mark, Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely of Travel and Research (1941) will be considered in detail. Weekend field trips will include intertidal exploration, a tour of the Jeffers Tor House in Carmel, and whale watching on Monterey Bay.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32A: Psychology of Architecture

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints