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DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 102: Musical Theater Dance Styles (MUSIC 184E)

Students will be able to demonstrate period specificity, character of style through learning different musical theater dances from the early 20th C.to the present. ALL students will participate in an end of quarter showing of the choreography developed and composed in class. Class will be supplemented with the occasional guest, DJ accompaniment and video viewing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 108: Hip Hop Choreography: Hip Hop Meets Broadway

What happens when Hip Hop meets "Fosse", "Aida", "Dream Girls" and "In the Heights"?nThe most amazing collaboration of Hip Hop styles adapted to some of the most memorable Broadway Productions.nThis class will explore the realm between Hip Hop Dance and the Broadway Stage. Infusing Acting thru dance movement and exploring the Art of Lip Sync thru Hip Hop Dance styles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 109: Choreography: Strategies to Building Movement, Dance, and Time Based Art

A class for students interested in contemporary methods of devising movement for performance. At the forefront of current dance culture hybridity has become the new normal, with movement blended from everyday actions, classical forms, hip-hop, and beyond. The body as a vehicle for expression is an ever expanding landscape and the class will focus on the plethora of ways movement can be derived including; the many ways improvisation can engender movement, how systemic approaches to performance can enhance a creators understanding of the body in space, the ways chaos and ugliness can redefine our notions of beauty, and how environment, sound, music, and context can inform our physical sensibilities. The class is open to all students from any movement background or those new to dance with a curiosity about how the body can be a vibrant and multifaceted artistic tool. For more information please contact choreographer and lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 123: Choreography: Hot Mess & Deliberate Failure as Practice

A dance class in how we become the worst dancer possible. The foundation of this class has many parts. One is that, in almost every respect the way we gain insight into anything is to understand more clearly its polarity. As a class we purposely explore chaos, failure, and "bad" dancing, with the hope that then we will have a greater chance to understand and refine our personal notions around beauty. The class also acknowledges that creativity is at times born from the loss of control. Instead of looking at this idea obliquely, Hot Mess looks at this directly by having dancers confront a number of movement and vocal prompts that are literally impossible to execute in any good way. This class embraces and celebrates destabilization, with all the exuberance, fear, and learning that can happen when we accept and practice being lost.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 141: Contemporary Modern III

This advanced level technique course will cover the fundamental principles underlying modern/contemporary dance both technical and artistic in nature. Students will perform technical exercises that develop functional efficiency, strength, flexibility, musicality, range of motion and performance quality as a means towards honing their own artistic expression and physicality. More advanced concepts such as qualitative versatility, phrasing awareness, innovative physical decision-making, and attention to performance will be explored in greater depth. The contemporary technique taught in this class prepares the student to perform with clarity and artistry, and with deeper anatomical knowledge and connectivity. Short written reflections and concert attendance will supplement studio work. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 148: Ballet II

Intermediate Ballet at Stanford is designed for students who have done ballet in their past, but maybe have stepped away from the form for awhile. The class focuses on technique, musicality, vocabulary, coordination and artistic choice. The class looks at ballet as an enduring and vibrant movement system that can be used for classical purposes or as a way to strengthen and diversify the movement vocabulary inherent in other dance forms like modern, hip-hop, or social dancing.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 149: Ballet III

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DLCL 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (ILAC 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

DLCL 113Q: Borges and Translation (ILAC 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
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