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451 - 459 of 459 results for: all courses

TAPS 178E: Advanced Playwriting Workshop (TAPS 278E)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is the first Asian-American female to have had her play produced in Broadway. This workshop will guide you through the process of of creating a script for a full-length piece of theater, and will focus on helping you to make significant progress on and/or complete a draft. You'll be required to write every week and give feedback on each others' work. You can be anywhere in your process--from having no idea what you want to do to being close to a final draft. This class is open to a wide range of approaches and styles--including adaptations and devised work. Both students who have never written for theater and students who have worked on a script with Young Jean in a previous class are welcome. This class is identical to TAPS 178C, except that preference is given to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Students must email the instructor at yjl@stanford.edu for permission to enroll in the class.
| UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 180P: Color (ARTSTUDI 180)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 278: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

THINK 49: Stories Everywhere

Do we perceive the world through stories? Are we made of stories? Can we make sense of the world without narrative? The telling of stories is not just a form of entertainment but an essential human activity that moves and persuades us, compelling us to action and reflection. In this course, we will probe how moral, cognitive and historical forces give stories their power. You will be introduced to the basic theory and art of storytelling, enabling you to understand and master the fundamentals of narrative structure, plot, and character. This will allow you to practice producing your own stories through both interpretative and creative writing assignments. The class will also give students the chance to participate in various story-making activities and work with the Stanford Storytelling Project, San Francisco StoryCorps, School of the Arts and the Stanford Innocence Project to create assignments that would be useful to both private and nonprofit organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

THINK 50: Empathy

This course will introduce freshmen to a range of ways of thinking about empathy. How do we know and understand the other? How does knowledge of another's experience and circumstances enable us to make moral decisions and take moral actions? It will take students on an intellectual investigation of the topic of empathy from the Buddhist emphasis on compassion in the fifth century BCE to Jesus' teaching of parables in the first century CE to Enlightenment philosophy to Silicon Valley¿s adoption of empathy in the twenty-first century. The main focus will be on the modern period (from the 18th to 20th century) and students will be asked to approach different genres of text through the lens of empathy. The course will culminate with a one-week creative workshop on the question of empathy.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

THINK 66: Design that Understands Us

What is the nature of design¿and the meaning it holds in human life? Why do we bother to design beautiful things? Is it possible to design truth and conscience into technology? How do we reconcile deep uncertainties brought on by new technology, with the underlying values we hold as humans?nnWhat we make, in turn, makes us. This course examines the nature, purpose, and meaning of design in human life, seeking to understand its underlying universality as an interweaving of engineering, art, philosophy, and a radical synthesis of means-to-ends (things done for the sake of another purpose; e.g., technology) and ends-in-themselves (things valued for their intrinsic worth; e.g., truth, beauty, morality, the idea of play). It explores design as something that both embraces and confronts technology, not purely as means to yet another end, but also in its potential for humanistic meaning, understanding, and poignancy. It examines the idea that we should not always design from practical needs (as we are often taught) but also from the values underlying the needs; that technology should not be only an agent of change, survival, or happiness, but through what we do with it, also a mirror to define our own humanness.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 171: Urban Design Studio (CEE 131D)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 183: Team Urban Design Studio (CEE 131E)

This new class offers an exciting variation on the 'individual project' studio format. Students work as a team to propose a single consensus solution to a real-world design challenge. This collaborative studio experience more closely reflects the creative process in the design and planning professions where a group of individuals works together to brainstorm, shape, develop, and illustrate a community design solution. There are a number of benefits to this team-oriented approach: it is a more nurturing environment for students that do not have design backgrounds, it allows for more peer-to-peer learning, and it takes best advantage of varied student skill sets. But perhaps the greatest benefit is that a team of students working together on a common project will be able to develop a more comprehensive solution than any one student working alone. This means that the class "deliverable" at the end of quarter could be detailed enough to be of significant value to a stakeholder or client group from the larger community. This studio class, working under the guidance of an experienced instructor, functions like a design firm in providing professional-grade deliverables to real-world community design "clients'.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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