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71 - 80 of 299 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 173: Issues in Contemporary Art (ARTHIST 373)

Major figures, themes, and movements of contemporary art from the 80s to the present. Readings on the neo-avant garde; postmodernism; art and identity politics; new media and technology; globalization and participatory aesthetics. Prerequisite: ARTHIST 155, or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 173N: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art

From Pop to postmodernism, contemporary art in the United States has often taken up issues of race, gender, and sexuality. In this seminar, we will study how artists from the 1960s to the present have drawn upon a wide range of media (including painting, photography, sculpture, performance, video, and the internet) to address racial injustice, gender inequity, and the surveillance of sexuality. Guest speakers will include contemporary artists confronting these issues in our current, highly charged moment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 178: Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature (AMSTUD 178, ARTHIST 378)

The role of the visual arts of the U.S. in the construction and contesting of racial, class, and gender hierarchies. Focus is on artists and writers from the 18th century to 1990s. How power, domination, and resistance work historically. Topics include: minstrelsy and the invention of race; mass culture and postmodernity; hegemony and language; memory and desire; and the borderlands.
Last offered: Spring 2004 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 181: Pacific Dreams: Art in California

This lecture course will explore the rich and diverse history of art made in California, with special focus on the interchanges between the fine arts and subcultural expression. From the Carleton Watkins' exquisite mammoth plate photographs of Yosemite to the cool sci-fi experiments of Light and Space artists such as James Turrell; from the feminist experiments of Judy Chicago to the black magic of Betye Saar's ritualistic objects, artists have explored California's landscape, history, and diverse population in myriad ways. Topics of study will include art in San Francisco Chinatown; Hollywood and contemporary performance; psychedelia and the counterculture; Afrofuturism; and glam, punk rock, and hardcore in Los Angeles. Special attention will be paid to issues of immigration, race, and ethnicity in California.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 182B: Cultures in Competition: Arts of Song-Era China (ARTHIST 382B)

The Song dynasty (mid-10th to late 13th c.) was a period of extraordinary diversity and technical accomplishment in Chinese painting, ceramics, calligraphy, architecture and sculpture. Artistic developments emerged within a context of economic dynamism, urban growth, and competition in dynastic, political, cultural and social arenas ¿ as between Chinese and formerly nomadic neighboring regimes, or between reformers and conservatives. This course will consider major themes and topics in Song art history, including innovations in architectural and ceramic technologies; developments in landscape painting and theory; the rise of educated artists; official arts and ideologies of Song, Liao and Jin court regimes; new roles for women as patrons and cultural participants; and Chan and popular Buddhist imagery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 183: Theatre of the World: Contemporary Chinese Art (ARTHIST 383)

This course examines the intense and profound changes in Chinese Art from the end of Cultural Revolution to the first decades of the twenty-first century. Multiple course meetings will take place in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World will be on view. We will explore how artists express their ways of grappling with the social, political, economic, and personal issues through art. Major topics include cultural multiplicity, global challenge, consumerism, site specificity, and deconstructing and reconstructing of identities, among others. Our discussions will constantly incorporate factors of China's domestic context, global network, and artists' individual connections in order for students to understand the rich and complex dynamics of Chinese contemporary art.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 183N: Making Paradises on the Silk Road: Buddhist Arts of the Dunhuang Grottoes

The cave temples of Dunhuang in far northwest China are the greatest repository of Chinese and Central Asian Buddhist arts from the medieval period of 5th to 14th centuries. This seminar will focus on caves that will be exhibited as full-scale replicas as part of the Getty Malibu Museum's International Dunhuang exhibition, which we will visit in a seminar field trip to Los Angeles. We will explore the spatial arrangement of sculptures and wall paintings, the imagery of Pure Land paradise scenes and narrative story cycles, and the embodied experience of movement around the caves. Through readings, discussions, VR simulation viewings, and exhibition visits we will also explore varied approaches to understanding the patronage, artistic styles, production techniques, devotional practices, and significance of these sacred spaces.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ARTHIST 184: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 384, JAPAN 184, JAPAN 284)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 185: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 385)

The dynamic period of late Ming and early Qing dynasty China, roughly 1500-1800 CE, was marked by political crisis and conquest, but also by China's participation in global systems of trade and knowledge exchanges involving porcelain, illustrated books, garden designs and systems of perspectival representation. Topics will include Innovations in urban centers of painting and print culture, politically inflected painting, and cultural syncretism in court painting and garden design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and literature of the United States. Key themes will include the history of immigration law; questions of home and belonging; art, activism, and community; interethnic solidarity; and gender and queerness. Artists and authors will include Isamu Noguchi, Grace Lee Boggs, Nam June Paik, Yoko Ono, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Grace Lee Boggs, Zarina, Carlos Villa, Takashi Murakami, Anne Cheng, Lisa Lowe, among many others. In addition to learning the history of Asian Americans and reading key texts in Asian American studies, this course will also teach the foundational skills of close looking and primary source research.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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