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101 - 110 of 299 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 210: Giotto (ARTHIST 410B)

Often hailed as ¿the father of western painting,¿ Giotto was seen as a revolutionary figure even in his own day. We will begin with Giotto¿s critical reception, his artistic predecessors and contemporaries, and his work for patrons ranging from the Franciscan order to the king of Naples. We will most closely examine Giotto¿s masterpiece, the frescoes of the Arena Chapel in Padua, and consider topics including Giotto¿s figural realism, the layered readings of the program, its use of visual rhetoric, and issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 212: Renaissance Florence, 1440-1540

Notions of cultural superiority in light of changes in Florentine society as it went from being a republic to a duchy ruled by the Medici. Artists and architects such as Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and Pontormo praised as having revived the arts and returned them to a level of ancient splendor. The role of the sacred in daily life and uses of the pagan past for poetic and scholarly expressions and as vehicles for contemporary experience.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 213: Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center

The seminar takes place in the Cantor Arts Center and provides a unique opportunity to study original works of art from the museum's storage. Beginning in the fifteenth century new techniques of reproduction changed the pictorial culture of Europe. Some engravings called attention to the engraver's virtuosity, and the private nature of the medium was explored for erotic imagery. By the sixteenth century printed images were used for political and religious propaganda during the societal upheavals.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ARTHIST 215C: What is Contemporary Art?

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of contemporary art. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate current understandings of contemporary art. We will also consider the history of contemporary art by looking at how art of the past was understood in its own moment, when it was new and now.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ARTHIST 216: Collecting for the Cantor

Students in this course will conduct the necessary art historical and collections research to select a work of art on paper for acquisition by the Cantor Arts Center. Readings and discussions will consider the history of collecting, as well as cultural, ethical, logistical, and economic questions involved in collection building. Prerequisite: one Art History course.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 217: Architecture, Mysticism, and Myth (ARTHIST 417)

This course examines global origin myths for architecture, for example cosmic symbolism (e.g. the Mandala/dome), and the magic of technologies (e.g. the "petrification" of the wooden hut in permanent architecture). Examples range from Ethiopian rockcut churches, to the Parthenon, to the Ise Grand Shrine, to Fire Temples, and Navajo lodges. The course concludes with the modern mythology of industrialisation and the mechanised building.

ARTHIST 217B: Architectural Design Theory (ARTHIST 417B)

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture.  Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media.  nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice.  nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.nCEE 32B is a crosslisting of ARTHIST 217B/417B.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 218A: Michelangelo: Gateway to Early Modern Italy (ARTHIST 418A, ITALIAN 237, ITALIAN 337)

Revered as one of the greatest artists in history, Michelangelo Buonarroti's extraordinarily long and prodigious existence (1475-1564) spanned the Renaissance and the Reformation in Italy. The celebrity artist left behind not only sculptures, paintings, drawings, and architectural designs, but also an abundantly rich and heterogeneous collection of artifacts, including direct and indirect correspondence (approximately 1400 letters), an eclectic assortment of personal notes, documents and contracts, and 302 poems and 41 poetic fragments. This course will explore the life and production of Michelangelo in relation to those of his contemporaries. Using the biography of the artist as a thread, this interdisciplinary course will draw on a range of critical methodologies and approaches to investigate the civilization and culture of Italy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Course themes will follow key tensions that defined the period and that found expression in Michelangelo: physical-spiritual, classical-Christian, tradition-innovation, individual-collective.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 219: Caravaggio, Vermeer, and the Life of Paintings

Focusing on great paintings by seventeenth-century European painters--Caravaggio's Medusa, Vermeer's Girl with the Pearl Earring, Rembrandt's Self-Portraits, and many others--this seminar will consider how and why artists these artists strove to overcome the boundary between representation and the real and make the world "present" to the viewer. Reading authors such as George Steiner and Jacques Derrida, we will develop a definition of the word "presence" and consider the various critiques of it.nnNOTE: This seminar is for undergraduates only.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 221E: Peripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia (ILAC 281E)

Why was Salvador Dalí fascinated with the architecture of Gaudí? Why did André Breton, Paul Éluard and Federico García Lorca visit Barcelona? Moreover, why did Catalonia become such an important cradle for Surrealism? Why is the (Catalan) landscape such a relevant presence in the work of Miró and Dalí? Through a critical analysis and discussion of selected works of art and literature, this seminar focuses and follows the trajectories of Miró and Dalí, from Barcelona to Paris to New York, and explores the role of their Catalan background as a potentially essential factor in their own contributions to Surrealism and the reception of their work. The course will provide the materials and guide the student to conduct research on a specific work(s) of art, architecture, literature or cinema either by Miró, Dalí or one of his peers in relation to their cultural, social and political context. The course is intended for graduate students in Iberian and Comparative Literature, Art History, Cultural Studies, and related fields. Taught in English by Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas.
Last offered: Autumn 2017
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