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BIO 150: Human Behavioral Biology (HUMBIO 160)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 153: Cellular Neuroscience: Cell Signaling and Behavior (PSYCH 120)

Neural interactions underlying behavior. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 or basic biology.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 155: Cell and Developmental Biology of Plants (BIO 255)

In this course we will learn how plants are built at different organizational scales from the cell, tissue, organ and organ system level. We will also learn about the experimental methods used to study plants at these different organizational levels and how to interpret and evaluate experiments that use such methods. Broadly relevant skills that will be cultivated in the course include: evaluating primarily literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, formulating research questions and designing new experimental strategies. Prerequisites: BIO 80 series
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Dinneny, J. (PI)

BIO 158: Developmental Neurobiology (BIO 258)

For advanced undergraduates and coterminal students. The principles of nervous system development from the molecular control of patterning, cell-cell interactions, and trophic factors to the level of neural systems and the role of experience in influencing brain structure and function. Topics: neural induction and patterning cell lineage, neurogenesis, neuronal migration, axonal pathfinding, synapse elimination, the role of activity, critical periods, and the development of behavior. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 2 or 3. Prerequisite: BIO 42 or BIO 82, 83, 84, 86.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 161: Organismal Biology Lab

This laboratory is a genuine research experience course where students will contribute to original research in a field of organismal biology. The course will consist of two modules: In the first module, students will perform a drug screen for novel compounds that influence animal behavior. In the second module, students will use gene editing technologies to test the role of specific proteins involved in mental diseases. Students will work collaboratively to collect and analyze data and will learn to communicate their findings clearly through oral and written formats. Prerequisites: BIO 82 or BIO 84 required or concurrent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 183: Theoretical Population Genetics (BIO 283)

Models in population genetics and evolution. Selection, random drift, gene linkage, migration, and inbreeding, and their influence on the evolution of gene frequencies and chromosome structure. Models are related to DNA sequence evolution. Prerequisites: calculus and linear algebra, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Feldman, M. (PI)

BIOC 109A: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 109B: Advances in Therapeutic Development: Neuronal Signaling and Immunology (BIO 109B)

This is a seminar course focused on teaching students about novel research and applications in the fields of neuroscience and immunology. The course will cover topics that range from the neuronal pathways in opioid addiction and the mechanics of pain, to advances in immunotherapy. Students will engage with diverse material from leading neuroscience and cancer immunotherapy experts in the Bay Area. Guest lecturers will visit from both academia and neighboring pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. Active participation is required. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program, but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOE 42: Physical Biology

BIOE 42 is designed to introduce students to general engineering principles that have emerged from theory and experiments in biology. Topics covered will cover the scales from molecules to cells to organisms, including fundamental principles of entropy, diffusion, and continuum mechanics. These topics will link to several biological questions, including DNA organization, ligand binding, cytoskeletal mechanics, and the electromagnetic origin of nerve impulses. In all cases, students will learn to develop toy models that can explain quantitative measurements of the function of biological systems. Prerequisites: MATH 19, 20, 21 CHEM 31A, B (or 31X), PHYSICS 41; strongly recommended: CS 106A, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
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