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GEOLSCI 90: Introduction to Geochemistry (EARTHSYS 90)

The chemistry of the solid earth and its atmosphere and oceans, emphasizing the processes that control the distribution of the elements in the earth over geological time and at present, and on the conceptual and analytical tools needed to explore these questions. The basics of geochemical thermodynamics and isotope geochemistry. The formation of the elements, crust, atmosphere and oceans, global geochemical cycles, and the interaction of geochemistry, biological evolution, and climate. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 102: Earth Materials: Introduction to Mineralogy

The minerals and materials that comprise the earth and their uses in modern society. How to identify, classify, and interpret rock-forming minerals. Emphasis is on information provided by common minerals about the nature of the Earth's interior and processes such as magmatism and metamorphism that operate there, as well as the major processes of weathering and erosion that link plate tectonics to earth cycles. Required lab section. Prerequisite: introductory geology course. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 103: Earth Materials: Rocks in Thin Section (GEOLSCI 203)

Use of petrographic microscope to identify minerals and common mineral associations in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Crystallization histories, mineral growth and reaction relations, deformation textures in metamorphic rocks, and provenance of siliciclastic rocks. Required lab section. Prerequisite 102.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 105: Introduction to Field Methods

Two-week, field-based course in the White Mountains of eastern California. Introduction to the techniques for geologic mapping and geologic investigation in the field: systematic observations and data collection for lithologic columns and structural cross-sections. Interpretation of field relationships and data to determine the stratigraphic and deformational history of the region. Prerequisite: GEOLSCI 1, recommended: GEOLSCI 102.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 106: Sediments: The Book of Earth's History

Topics: weathering, erosion and transportation, deposition, origins of sedimentary structures and textures, sediment composition, diagenesis, sedimentary facies, tectonics and sedimentation, and the characteristics of the major siliciclastic and carbonate depositional environments. Required Lab Section: methods of analysis of sediments in hand specimen and thin section. There is a required field problem trips to the field site(s) during the quarter, data collection and analysis, and preparation of a final written and oral report. Prerequisites: 1, 102, 103.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 107: Journey to the Center of the Earth (GEOLSCI 207, GEOPHYS 184, GEOPHYS 274)

The interconnected set of dynamic systems that make up the Earth. Focus is on fundamental geophysical observations of the Earth and the laboratory experiments to understand and interpret them. What earthquakes, volcanoes, gravity, magnetic fields, and rocks reveal about the Earth's formation and evolution.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 110: Our Dynamic West (GEOLSCI 294)

Theory, principles, and practical techniques to measure, describe, analyze, and interpret deformation-related structures on Earth. Collection of fault and fold data in the field followed by lab and computer analysis; interpretation of geologic maps and methods of cross-section construction; structural analysis of fault zones and metamorphic rocks; measuring deformation; regional structural styles and associated landforms related to plate tectonic convergence, rifting and strike-slip faulting; the evolution of mountain belts and formation of sedimentary basins. Prerequisite: GEOLSCI 1, calculus. Recommended: 102, 105.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 123: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, EARTHSYS 122, GEOLSCI 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
| UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 128: Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems (BIO 148, BIO 228, EARTHSYS 128, GEOLSCI 228)

The what, when, where, and how do we know it regarding life on land through time. Fossil plants, fungi, invertebrates, and vertebrates (yes, dinosaurs) are all covered, including how all of those components interact with each other and with changing climates, continental drift, atmospheric composition, and environmental perturbations like glaciation and mass extinction. The course involves both lecture and lab components. Graduate students registering at the 200-level are expected to write a term paper, but can opt out of some labs where appropriate.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 135: Sedimentary Geochemistry and Analysis (GEOLSCI 235)

Introduction to research methods in sedimentary geochemistry. Proper laboratory techniques and strategies for generating reliable data applicable to any future labwork will be emphasized. This research-based course will examine how the geochemistry of sedimentary rocks informs us about local and global environmental conditions during deposition. Students will collect geochemical data from a measured stratigraphic section in the western United States. These samples will be collected during a four-day field trip at the end of spring break (attendance encouraged but not required). In lab, students will learn low-temperature geochemical techniques focusing on the cycling of biogeochemical elements (O, C, S, and Fe) in marine sediments throughout Earth history. The focus will be on geochemistry of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks (shale) but the geochemistry of carbonates will also be explored. This is a lab-based course complemented with lectures. Students who wish to take the course for less than 4 units must receive approval from the instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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