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CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 70N: Water, Public Health, and Engineering

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 73: Water: An Introduction

Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 177: Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 178: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 276)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 179A: Water Chemistry Laboratory (CEE 273A)

(Graduate students register for 273A.) Laboratory application of techniques for the analysis of natural and contaminated waters, emphasizing instrumental techniques
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 25N: Science in the News

Preference to freshmen. Possible topics include: diseases such as avian flu, HIV, and malaria; environmental issues such as climate change, atmospheric pollution, and human population; energy sources in the future; evolution; stem cell research; nanotechnology; and drug development. Focus is on the scientific basis for these topics as a basis for intelligent discussion of societal and political implications. Sources include the popular media and scientific media for the nonspecialist, especially those available on the web.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Andersen, H. (PI)

CHEM 29N: Chemistry in the Kitchen

This course examines the chemistry relevant to food and drink preparation, both in homes and in restaurants, which makes what we consume more pleasurable. Good cooking is more often considered an art rather than a science, but a small bit of understanding goes a long way to make the preparation and consumption of food and drink more enjoyable. The intention is to have demonstrations and tastings as a part of every class meeting. We will examine some rather familiar items in this course: eggs, dairy products, meats, breads, vegetables, pastries, and carbonated beverages. We shall playfully explore the chemistry that turns food into meals. A high-school chemistry background is assumed; bring to class a good appetite and a healthy curiosity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 31A: Chemical Principles I

For students with moderate or no background in chemistry. Stoichiometry; periodicity; electronic structure and bonding; gases; enthalpy; phase behavior. Emphasis is on skills to address structural and quantitative chemical questions; lab provides practice. Recitation.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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