2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

401 - 410 of 452 results for: %

PWR 91OID: Creating Your Digital Presence: Learn How to Build Your Online Identity and Why it Matters

Have you ever Googled yourself? If so, what information about you rises to the top? A picture of you in your band uniform from your high school? A poem you wrote and published on your Tumblr? Maybe your scores from a 5K you ran last year? nnIt might seem like you don¿t have much control over what you see about yourself in a Google search, but the fact is, you do. The more that you create your own content, the more that your self-created information will rise to the top. Through learning the theories, tools, and techniques behind digital image management, this class will help prepare you for curating your digital self. In so doing, we can get better connected with the individuals and/or organizations that interest us. nnWe will practice several pragmatic techniques for building our own personal ePortfolio (i.e. a website). Through participating in hands-on activities, storytelling exercises, and in-class discussions, you will have the opportunity to enact what we¿re learning and to experiment with different forms of expressing yourself online.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91SP: Intermediate Writing: Doctors' Stories: The Rhetoric of Illness and Healing

While medicine is a science that relies on meticulous research and professional protocols, it is also full of characters, conflicts, scenes, dialogues, and resolutions; in other words, stories. This course explores why we must value communication in medicine and how narratives mediate that communication. During the quarter, you will pursue independent research on a topic of your choice in the health sciences and practice interviewing experts as well as writing accurate and engaging science journalism in a number of genres: the story pitch, the news story, and the profile. Your final project will be a research-based digital magazine story coached by the Stanford Storytelling Project.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SINY 114: Writing in the City

The craft of fiction writing and introduction to the literary culture of New York. Writing exercises will tune students¿ senses to the rhythms of New York. Students produce their own short stories, which will be examined in workshop discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Orringer, J. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

SINY 140: Mapping, time, space, and culture

New York, the financial and cultural capitol of the nation, provides an extraordinary laboratory for exploring the art and science of information representation. The proposed course aims to engage students in a broad swath of art and culture, contextualized by studying the sociopolitical urban landscape.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

SINY 142: Documenting New York

Documenting New York is a film studies course (with a small video production component) exploring the rich history and many cultures of New York through the classic documentary films that have been produced throughout the city¿s past hundred years.Through the lens of documentary films that feature New York City as a landscape and central subject, students will gain a greater understanding of the documentary film form itself, considering aesthetic and formal issues, as well as ethical issues related to the politics of representation.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SINY 152: Film: The City as Muse

Has a film ever challenged your beliefs, transformed your understanding of an issue, left an emotional aftershock, or motivated you to act? Was that the intention of the filmmaker or an unanticipated consequence? Since the inception of the motion picture, the urban landscape and its inhabitants have served as a rich and diverse palette for filmmakers. This course will provide an overview of documentary, experimental, and hybrid films that proffer an unexpected and sometimes disturbing perspective on cities, both here and abroad. We will examine films that privilege artistic expression and expand the conventions of the film form, analyzing how filmmakers distill an issue, situation, or environment through a particular formal style and point-of-view.nnThrough a consideration of iconic historic films, the student will gain a rich understanding of how cities have inspired filmmakers who work outside the traditional fiction genre. In addition to written assignments, students will distill th more »
Has a film ever challenged your beliefs, transformed your understanding of an issue, left an emotional aftershock, or motivated you to act? Was that the intention of the filmmaker or an unanticipated consequence? Since the inception of the motion picture, the urban landscape and its inhabitants have served as a rich and diverse palette for filmmakers. This course will provide an overview of documentary, experimental, and hybrid films that proffer an unexpected and sometimes disturbing perspective on cities, both here and abroad. We will examine films that privilege artistic expression and expand the conventions of the film form, analyzing how filmmakers distill an issue, situation, or environment through a particular formal style and point-of-view.nnThrough a consideration of iconic historic films, the student will gain a rich understanding of how cities have inspired filmmakers who work outside the traditional fiction genre. In addition to written assignments, students will distill their own experience of the city through photo essays that explore the eclectic geographic, social, and cultural life of New York. Local ¿field trips¿ will include attendance at the annual Margaret Mead Film Festival in October and DocNYC in November. Course readings and discussion will provide an incisive inquiry into the artistic ¿voice¿ of the filmmaker in an analysis of both form and content.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

TAPS 17N: Acting for Activists

Acting for Activists is designed for students who are interested in combining acting with activism, performance with politics. We will work with theatre that responds to specific political events and crisis such as hate crimes or war through the performance of activist texts. We will also explore works that challenge inequalities of income, race, gender and sexual orientation. By the end of the course students will cultivate a critical vocabulary for discussing and critiquing work within acting/activist contexts and develop new strategies for creating theatre in relation to issues they are passionate about. Acting for Activists encourages students to think about what they want to say and helps them craft how they want to say it.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

StoryCraft is a hands-on, experiential workshop offering participants the opportunity, structure and guidance to craft compelling personal stories to be shared in front of a live audience. The class will focus on several areas of storytelling: Mining (how do you find your stories and extract the richest details?); Crafting (how do you structure the content and shape the language?); and Performing (how do you share your stories with presence, authenticity and connection?)
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 21S: StoryCraft: On Relationships (FEMGEN 21S)

Do we need love? And if so, what does it look like? In this class, students will learn about relationships from the inside out: through an examination and telling of their lived experiences. We will explore various perspectives on intimacy and relationships that illuminate different aspects of our lives, and then dive into our own stories to discover the many facets of intimacy. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection. Students will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond Sex Ed: Intimacy & Relationships in Winter 2020. Before enrolling, ensure that you will be on campus Winter 2020 in case you are selected for the performance. Please fill out this short application for enrollment: bit.ly/Fall2019StoryCraft. Class will be held in Kingscote Gardens 140.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Booth, B. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints