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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

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ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q, DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of poetry (meter, rhythm, lineation, rhetorical figures and tropes) and the exploration of lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poem). Students write original poems throughout the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ITALIC 92: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Art Worlds: Conversations between Artists and Scholars

ITALIC 92, Art Worlds: Conversations between Artists and Scholars. This course is built around a series of conversations between nine scholar/critic and artist pairs. We will be entering the conversation in media res, as it were, since all of these pairs have histories together; they've had studio visits, late-night phone calls, email and text conversations. Usually the scholar has written about the artist and maybe the artist has suggested reading and viewing lists to the scholar. They've helped each other feel seen, and often be seen in a more literal way.The conversations will concentrate on these questions: How do artists and scholars work across the divide between practice and theory? How should you build your art world and who will be in it? The pairs will discuss their respective practices (art-making, writing, researching, community-building) and engage in conversation about the artist's work. In advance of each conversation, students will read about something written by the scholar/critic about the artist. Each artist will also design a short art-making prompt for enrolled students to complete and share through the course website. Students will share their artworks weekly in small critique groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging

ITALIC 93, Challenging. This quarter focuses on art that challenges audiences' expectations and values. We consider what is at stake in the encounter with difficult art. How does difficult art contest cultural, political, and social assumptions and values or challenge expectations about the form and content of art? How can art challenge existing power structures in society? How does art challenge its viewers, by troubling disciplinary boundaries or the rules of genre? What are the ethical responsibilities of artists? Over the course of the quarter, students will meet with a master artist 6 times during section, honing work in their chosen medium and developing a project that will be presented in an end-quarter exhibition and published in an online magazine.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ITALIC 100: ITALIC Seminar: Notes to a Young Artist

Working with the Haas Center, students in this seminar will create a mini-magazine/online course about art to share with students at a Bay Area high school. You will assemble a list of suggested readings and brief essays on key artistic texts and concepts, as well as images and links to the artistic examples you find most inspiring. You will create a variety of media about these ideas and artists, from illustrated slideshows to video essays or podcasts to short explanatory texts and longer personal essays. The guiding question of the course is: What does a young artist need to know?
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

LIFE 101: Tools for a Meaningful Life

Explores the foundational skills for a meaningful life. Features lectures by faculty from across the university and labs for experiential practice. Draws on research and practices from fields related to psychology, philosophy, literature, and neuroscience, as well as wisdom traditions from around the world. Focuses on developing human capacities necessary for a meaningful life including; attention, courage, devotion, resilience, imagination, and gratitude. Exposure to these capacities influences personal growth and its development in communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
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