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APPPHYS 10AX: The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Fuzzell, D. (PI)

APPPHYS 100: The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (ARTSINST 100)

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

ARCHLGY 106A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 306A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 305B, DLCL 123)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 HISTORY 115D Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 counts for DLCL 123.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 225: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 425, HISTORY 205J, HISTORY 305J)

( History 205J is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305J is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSINST 100: The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (APPPHYS 100)

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

ARTSINST 142: Drawing with Code (ARTSTUDI 163)

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSINST 172: Practice and Critique (ARTSINST 272)

Appropriate for MFA candidates in Documentary Film or Art Practice or for advanced undergraduates working in visual art or time-based media, ¿Practice and Critique¿ is designed to enhance students' understanding of critical issues within their own work and the work of their peers. The artist and instructor will collaboratively direct feedback on work in progress. Feedback of finished work (or a completed component of a larger / thesis project) will follow a critique method developed by feminist artist and educator Mary Kelly in which the artist doesn't speak until the end of the session. We begin by reflecting on the affective, perceptual and phenomenological experiences engendered by the work. In doing so, we slow down our natural inclination to seek answers about ¿what the work (or film) means¿ by paying close attention to how it goes about producing meaning. In time, we proceed towards the denotative, referential and connotative meanings available to be read within the work. Finally we invite the artist to ask questions of the class and reflect upon their experience of the critique. Students will come away with a deeper and more nuanced understanding of how their work affects an audience. Optional one-on-one meetings with the instructor will provide opportunities for directed problem-solving and, depending on the goals and interests of students enrolled in the course, additional class time may be dedicated to screenings, field trips, studio visits or other activities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Tribe, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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