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PHIL 184: Topics in Epistemology (PHIL 284)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

PHIL 185: Special Topics in Epistemology: Testimony in science and everyday life (PHIL 285)

Much of what we know, we know by relying on the testimony of other individuals, groups, traditional news media or social media. The course explores varieties of testimonial knowledge which arise from relaxed everyday testimony ('the coffee machine is broken') and from scientific expert testimony ('Venus is larger than Mars'). The course also touches on issues concerning testimonial injustice ¿ the type of injustice that occurs when someone is wronged in their capacity as a testifier ¿ for example, when their testimony is unjustly devaluated. Finally, we will consider whether philosophical theorizing about testimony may shed light on obstacles for science communication about divisive issues such as vaccines, climate science etc.nnThus, the course is organized around three interrelated themes. 1: Foundational questions, 2: Testimonial injustice and 3: Scientific testimony. Overall, then, the course connects foundational work in epistemology and philosophy of science to some pertinent ethical and political problems.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)

PHIL 186: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 286)

(Graduate students register for 286.) This is an advanced introduction to core topics in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: PHIL 80
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Jackson, G. (PI)

PHIL 193C: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 194H: Capstone Seminar on Justification and Consciousness

In this seminar we¿ll discuss some central notions of epistemology ¿ in particular: justification, evidence and rationality ¿ and how they connect with the notions of consciousness and reflection. Capstone seminar for the major.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

PHIL 194W: Capstone Seminar: Imagination in Fiction and Philosophy

This course spans the disciplinary divide between philosophy and literature by examining a mental faculty they both use: the imagination. The importance of the imagination in philosophy is contested: can it really help us understand what is possible and what's not, and if so, how? The role of the imagination in literature is undeniable, but often surprising in its details: why do we have real emotions in response to fictional stories? why do we seek out the negative emotions associated with tragedy and horror stories? Through guided discussion, live debate, close reading (of both philosophy and literature), and extensive writing, we will gain some insight into the fundamental faculty of thought that is the imagination. This is a capstone seminar for undergraduate majors in philosophy. Prerequisites: three courses in philosophy, including Philosophy 80.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Peacocke, A. (PI)

POLISCI 31N: Political Freedom: Rights, Justice, and Democracy in the Western Tradition

Freedom is one of our core values. Most people can agree that freedom is a good thing. Yet there is far less agreement about how to understand the concept itself and what kinds of political arrangements are best suited to protect and enhance freedom. Is freedom about being left alone? Undertaking action with others? Participating in governance? Does freedom require a limited state? An active and interventionist government? A robustly participatory political system? How is freedom connected to other political values, like justice and equality? This seminar will consider and evaluate some of the most controversial and challenging answers that have been given to these questions by canonical thinkers like John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx, as well as by more contemporary political and legal thinkers like Jeremy Waldron and Cass Sunstein. We will also examine how questions about the nature of freedom play out on college campuses and in the courts.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

POLISCI 124A: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

POLISCI 131L: Modern Political Thought: Machiavelli to Marx and Mill (ETHICSOC 131S)

This course is an introduction to the history of Western political thought from the late fifteenth century through the nineteenth century. We will consider the secularization of politics, the changing relationship between the individual and society, the rise of consent-based forms of political authority, and the development and critiques of liberal conceptions of property. We will cover the following thinkers: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Marx.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

POLISCI 137A: Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition (ETHICSOC 176, PHIL 176, PHIL 276, POLISCI 337A)

(Graduate students register for 276.) What makes political institutions legitimate? What makes them just? When do citizens have a right to revolt against those who rule over them? Which of our fellow citizens must we tolerate?Surprisingly, the answers given by some of the most prominent modern philosophers turn on the idea of a social contract. We will focus on the work of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Rawls.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Wenar, L. (PI)
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