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ILAC 272: New Brazilian Cinema

This course studies cinema from Brazil with a focus on films from the last decade. We will consider how to effectively talk and write about film, particularly according to Brazil's specific historical and cultural context and from a perspective of social realism. Numerous readings and discussions will bolster our viewings of fiction films and documentaries. Directors include Kleber Mendonça Filho, Anna Muylaert, Gabriel Mascaro, Karim Aïnouz, Aly Muritiba, and Petra Costa. Taught in English; films shown with English subtitles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - From Novel to Film

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. All students must contact instructor to obtain an enrollment code. How are film and novels alike? How are they different? Can the study of cinematographic adaptation of novels help us understand better the specific nature of literature and that of film? What does it mean to be 'faithful' to a work of literature in a new medium? To address these questions, the course combines a selection of major Latin American novels and plays, as well as a panorama of Latin American cinematography, from 1960s's films to contemporary productions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Self-Writing in Latin America

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. Why is self-narrative a daring form for the feminine voice? How does writing the self affect notions of identity? The course examines self-writing across different formats: diaries, memoirs, fiction and comics. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ITALIAN 115: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data (CLASSICS 115, ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can digital approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior experience necessary.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 127: Spectacles of Love, Spectacles of Horror: Introduction to Medieval Italian Literature

This course is both an introduction to medieval Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. Our voyage through medieval Italian literature will explore the interconnected realms of Eros and Death, of Love and Horror: how to reconcile religiosity and the viscerally carnal images of this period's poetry? Why is the heart object of adoration and, at the same time, of cannibalistic cravings? We will begin our journey in the XIII century with religious poetry and the Sicilian School, to then move and dwell in the Florence of Cavalcanti, Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Florence will be the main stage for our Spectacles of Love and Horror: a city at once cradle of Dolce Stil Novo and of bloody political fights, almost completely annihilated by the 'Black Death' in the XIV century. The protagonists of our story will be some of the most extraordinary works of Italian Literature, such as Saint Francis' Cantico delle creature, Dante's Commedia, Petrarch's Canzoniere, Boccaccio's Decameron. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent level of proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Capra, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 129: Modern Italian Culture

This course examines the fate of Italian culture since 1800. We will study major examples of Italian literature, art, and cinema from the modern period in relation to their historical context. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Biffanti, D. (PI)

ITALIAN 152: Boccaccio's Decameron: The Ethics of Storytelling (ITALIAN 352)

This course involves an in-depth study of Boccaccio's Decameron in the context of medieval theories of poetry and interpretation. The goal is to understand more fully the relationship between literature and lived experience implied by Boccaccio's fictions. We will address key critical issues and theoretical approaches related to the text. Taught in English translation, there will be an optional supplementary Italian discussion section during weeks 2-9.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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