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FILMSTUD 112: Women in French Cinema: 1958- (FEMGEN 192, FRENCH 192)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Buñuel, Truffaut, Varda, Chabrol, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units. Class meets Tuesday/Thursday 1:30-2:50pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm. NOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FILMSTUD 114: Reading Comics (AMSTUD 114X, FILMSTUD 314)

The modern medium of comics, a history that spans 150 years. The flexibility of the medium encountered through the genres of humorous and dramatic comic strips, superheroes, undergrounds, independents, journalism, and autobiography. Innovative creators including McCay, Kirby, Barry, Ware, and critical writings including McCloud, Eisner, Groenstee. Topics include text/image relations, panel-to-panel relations, the page, caricature, sequence, seriality, comics in the context of the fine arts, and relations to other media.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 115: Documentary Issues and Traditions (FILMSTUD 315)

Issues include objectivity/subjectivity, ethics, censorship, representation, reflexivity, responsibility to the audience, and authorial voice. Parallel focus on form and content.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Krawitz, J. (PI)

FILMSTUD 116: International Documentary (FILMSTUD 316)

Historical, aesthetic, and formal developments of documentary through nonfiction films in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FILMSTUD 117: MEDIA AND MESSAGE: THE EXPERIENCE OF INFORMATION

We live in an information age, and information comes to us through various media. But different media ¿embody¿ information differently, and are experienced differently. How do these differences impact the ways we come to understand the world and our place in it? One example: Photography, cinema, and console games all attempt to communicate the experience of war, but each does so in its own way -- a Robert Capa photograph of the moment when a soldier is shot is different from the sensory and narrative immersion of Saving Private Ryan, which is different from the interactive experience of Call of Duty. nnFollowing Marshall McLuhan¿s dictum that ¿the medium is the message,¿ this course will examine the ways that different media present, organize, and structure information as forms that are ¿read¿ or experienced. The course will consider such historical media as illuminated books, print, painting, and photography, and such recent forms as cinema, television, comics, presentation software, and interactive and computational media. Readings will be drawn from across disciplines, and will include McLuhan, Sontag, Merleau-Ponty, Goffman, Jenkins, Hayles, and others. Fiction, film screenings, and comics reading will also be part of the course.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 120: Superhero Theory (AMSTUD 120B, ARTHIST 120, ARTHIST 320, FILMSTUD 320)

With their fantastic powers, mutable bodies, multiple identities, complicated histories, and visual dynamism, the American superhero has been a rich vehicle for fantasies (and anxieties) for 80+ years across multiple media, including comics, film, animation, TV, games, toys, and apparel. This course will center upon the body of the superhero, as it incarnates allegories of race, queerness, hybridity, sexuality, gendered stereotypes/fluidity, politics, vigilantism, masculinity, and monstrosity. They also embody a technological history that encompasses industrial, atomic, electronic, bio-genetic, and the digital.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Bukatman, S. (PI)

FILMSTUD 125: Horror Film

From its beginnings, the cinema evinced an affinity with the phantom realm of specters, ghosts, and supernatural beings. Not only does horror have deep and diverse roots in the international history of film; it emerges as a trope of film itself, as a medium of shadows, dematerialized presence, life drained of substance. Overview of filmic imaginations of horror with a focus on the U.S., Europe, and Japan. Theories of horror, from the fantastic to the uncanny; unpacking these in light of key moments in the genre's development. The merits of vampires versus zombies. Ongoing debates through the lens of horror about cinematic representation, from Linda Williams' thesis of body genres to Jeffrey Sconce's notion of haunted media.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 132A: Indian Cinema (FILMSTUD 332A)

This course will provide an overview of cinema from India, the world's largest producer of films. We will trace the history of Indian cinema from the silent era, through the studio period, to state-funded art filmmaking to the contemporary production of Bollywood films as well as the more unconventional multiplex cinema. We will examine narrative conventions, stylistic techniques, and film production and consumption practices in popular Hindi language films from the Bombay film industry as well as commercial and art films in other languages. This outline of different cinematic modes will throw light on the social, political, and economic transformations in the nation-state over the last century.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FILMSTUD 133: Contemporary Chinese Auteurs (FILMSTUD 333)

New film cultures and movements in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and mainland China in the 80s. Key directors including Jia Zhangke, Wu Wenguang, Tsai Ming-liang, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Wong Kar-wai, Ann Hui. Topics include national cinema in the age of globalization, the evolving parameters of art cinema, and authorship.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 133B: Technology and American Visual Culture (AMSTUD 133)

An exploration of the dynamic relationship between technology and the ways we see and represent the world, with a focus on American visual culture from the 19th century through the present. We study the history of different tools from telescopes and microscopes to digital detectors that have changed and enhanced our visual capabilities; the way technological shifts, such as the introduction of electric lights or train travel, have shaped our visual imagination and aesthetic sensibilities; and how technology has inspired or responded to visual art. Special attention is paid to how different media, such as photography, cinema, and computer screens, translate the visual experience into a representation; the automation of vision; and the intersection of technology with notions of time and space.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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