2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

221 - 230 of 1063 results for: %

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

This course traces the emergence and development of the distinctive cultural world of the ancient Egyptians over nearly 4,000 years. Through archaeological and textual evidence, we will investigate the social structures, religious beliefs, and expressive traditions that framed life and death in this extraordinary region. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

CLASSICS 88: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (HISTORY 114)

What¿s the history of `History¿? The first ancient historians wrote about commoners and kings, conquest and power¿those who had it, those who wanted it, those without it. Their powerful ways of recounting the past still resonate today and can be harnessed to tell new stories. We will look at how ancients like Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy turned stories about the past into compelling narratives of loss, growth and decline¿inventing ¿History¿ as we know it. All readings in English.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 93: Pots, People, and Press: Greek Archaeology in the Media (ARCHLGY 83)

Archaeological discovery has long captured the popular imagination, and the media undoubtedly plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. In the case of Greek archaeology, much of this imagination has been intertwined with the legacies of ancient Greek culture(s) in the construction of modern identities and ideologies, including the concept of ¿Western Civilization.¿ This course explores the intersections between academic research, media narratives, and the social, political, and cultural context of Greek archaeology from the 19th century to the present. Through a diachronic range of case studies, we will engage with a selection of media accounts and representations, alongside scholarly work and commentaries. In doing so, the class will more broadly examine issues surrounding archaeological evidence and interpretation, narrative formation, the reception and appropriation of the past, conceptualizations of race and ethnicity, nationalism and archaeology, and cultural heritage management. No prior knowledge of Greek archaeology is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 96: The Secret Lives of Statues from Ancient Egypt to Confederate Monuments (ARCHLGY 96, ARTHIST 104A)

Statues, human-shaped sculptures, walk a fine line between being inert matter and living entities. Throughout human existence, humans have recognized that statues are not alive even as they understand that statues are capable of becoming potent allies or enemies. They are capable of engendering profound emotional responses, embodying potent ideas, and co-opting the past in service of the present. However, the same materiality that endows statues with these exceptional capacities also makes them vulnerable to humans intent on acquiring otherwise-expensive materials cheaply, commiting sectarian violence by proxy, and obliterating the material manifestations of others¿ memories.nnIn this course, we will study sixteen (groups of) statues thematically. To do this, we will draw on a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, history, law, media studies, museum studies, and religious studies, to articulate how people in diverse places and times have revered and reviled statues precisely because they are uncanny objects that seem to have an all-too-human kind of agency. In so doing, we will gain appreciation for and insight into how and why the statues in our own lives are significant.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gisch, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 102L: Advanced Latin: Early Latin (CLASSICS 209L)

Most of the literature that we read in Latin is from a relatively late period of the language's history. However, Latin-speaking people wrote sophisticated texts hundreds of years before Cicero and Caesar, although much of this early writing has been lost to history. But not all! In this class we will explore the rich remains of Early Latin, with readings that include archaic inscriptions, early Latin prose from Cato the Elder, selections from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, and fragments from Androniucs, Naevius, and Ennius, the first known writers of Latin epic poetry. In parallel, we will also explore the history of the Latin language during this early period, emphasizing the historical developments that distinguish Early Latin from Classical Latin, as well as the historical reasons so much early Latin writing was not preserved. Students should be able to read Latin at an Intermediate-to-Advanced level, but no experience with linguistics, Early Latin, or Roman History is expected or required. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bork, H. (PI)

CLASSICS 103L: Advanced Latin: Lucan's Pharsalia

In the year 60 CE, Marcus Annaeus Lucanus was a favorite of of the emperor Nero; five years later he was compelled to end his own life as a participant in the Pisonian conspiracy. In these last years of his life, he wrote the 10 books of his likely incomplete Pharsalia, also known as De Bello Civili. This epic looks back over a century to what the author describes not just a civil wars but as bella plus quam civilia. In this class, we will follow Lucan's epic to the extremes of graphic violence in Latin, pitting Roman against Roman, man against snake, and corpse against witch. We will explore Lucan's masterwork against the landscape of the Neronian era and in comparison with other writing of this so-called silver age of Latin literature. Readings will be in the original Latin with the addition of relevant secondary scholarship. We will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context as needed. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dubit, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 115: Virtual Italy: Methods for Historical Data Science (ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can computational approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior programming experience necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 125: The Hindu Epics and the Ethics of Dharma (RELIGST 123)

The two great Hindu Epics, the Mahabharata and Ramayana, offer a sustained reflection on the nature of virtuous living in the face of insoluble ethical dilemmas. Their treatment of the concept of dharma, understood simultaneously as ethical action and the universal order that upholds the cosmos, lies at the heart of both Gandhian non-violent resistance and communalist interreligious conflict. This course will focus on a reading of selections from the Epics in English translation, supplemented with a consideration of how the texts have been interpreted in South Asian literary history and contemporary politics and public life in India.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

CLASSICS 126: The archaeology of death

Death is a universal human experience, but one that evokes a wide range of cultural and material responses. Archaeologists have used mortuary and bioarchaeological evidence to try to understand topics as diverse as paleodemography, human health and disease, social structure and inequalities, ritual, and identity and personhood. As such, the archaeology of death has become a locus for lively debates about archaeological interpretation. Furthermore, the study of human remains and mortuary contexts raises a set of complex ethical and political issues. We will explore these themes using a range of archaeological and anthropological case studies from different times and places.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints