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CLASSICS 56: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (ARTHIST 1A)

A survey of the art and architecture from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic Cathedrals of France; the material is organized both chronologically and thematically and covers a multiplicity of religions: pagan, Christian, and Islamic.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CLASSICS 58: Egypt in the Age of Heresy (AFRICAAM 58A, AFRICAST 58, ARCHLGY 58)

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 88: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (HISTORY 114)

What¿s the history of `History¿? The first ancient historians wrote about commoners and kings, conquest and power¿those who had it, those who wanted it, those without it. Their powerful ways of recounting the past still resonate today and can be harnessed to tell new stories. We will look at how ancients like Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy turned stories about the past into compelling narratives of loss, growth and decline¿inventing ¿History¿ as we know it. All readings in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ceserani, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 102L: Advanced Latin: Elegy (CLASSICS 209L)

As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 103L: Advanced Latin: Livy

Livy's Book VI tells the history of Republican Rome from 390 to 367 BCE, years of profound change in Roman society, while the city is reconstructed after being sacked by the Gauls. How does Livy make his story lifelike and convincing? What is the role of individuals in this narrative? How do moral readings of past events balance political ones? How does Livy involve his readers in reconstructing Rome and its past? Close attention to language, style and narrative techniques. Classics majors and minors must take course for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ceserani, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 110.) Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 115: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data (ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can digital approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior experience necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 125: The Hindu Epics and the Ethics of Dharma (COMPLIT 193, RELIGST 123)

The two great Hindu Epics, the Mahabharata and Ramayana, offer a sustained reflection on the nature of virtuous living in the face of insoluble ethical dilemmas. Their treatment of the concept of dharma, understood simultaneously as ethical action and the universal order that upholds the cosmos, lies at the heart of both Gandhian non-violent resistance and communalist interreligious conflict. This course will focus on a reading of selections from the Epics in English translation, supplemented with a consideration of how the texts have been interpreted in South Asian literary history and contemporary politics and public life in India.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

CLASSICS 130: The Grandeur of Epic: Poetry, Narrative, and World from Homer to Evolutionary Biology (COMPLIT 132)

Explores the mystery and power of epic. This ancient word, which at its root means "what is spoken," first classified certain traditions of archaic Greek poetry, especially Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. It now appears everywhere from slang to contemporary scientific discourse. Though some might dismiss its proliferation as an accident of everyday speech, the course will take the phenomenon of "epic" seriously, asking what it is about this oldest of genres that continues to inspire our collective imagination. Readings will include works of epic as well as theoretical and philosophical works on narrative, religion, and science. We will read substantial selections from the Iliad, Hesiod's poems, the Hebrew Bible, the Gospels, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, J.R.R. Tolkien's Silmarillion, and Ursula K. Le Guin's A Wizard of Earthsea.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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