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351 - 360 of 892 results for: all courses

HISTORY 5S: Comparative Partitions: Pakistan, Israel, and the Modern World (FEMGEN 5S)

Modern maps of the world simplify history by portraying the partitioning of territory as adding another border to a map, a naturalized action in the histories of sovereignty. The partitions of India and Palestine in 1947 and 1948 involved division of territory, but were also influenced by international commitments to secure representation for religious minorities. This course focuses on the key global discussions deployed by Indian Muslims and European Jews to understand the nature of their demands for a nation and determine the historical situations that resulted in the creation of sovereign nations. These partitions demonstrate how events, people, geographies, histories and ideas are powerfully linked on a global scale.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 7G: Making Anglo-American Capitalism (HISTORY 107G)

This course addresses capitalism in global perspective to identify the roots of our current economic system. We will consider theories about capitalism, the politics and policies of implementation, and the human and environmental consequences through topics such as the imperial political economy, consumerism, plantation economies, the East India Company, and the rise of credit. Embedding markets in a range of social relations, cultural practices, and institutional arrangements, reveals how capital became an -ism in specific and knowable historical circumstances.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 8S: Counterinsurgency and Torture: Algeria, Vietnam, and Iraq

How are the post-WWII guerrilla wars in Algeria, Vietnam, and Iraq connected? How have French and American counterinsurgency planners applied ¿lessons learned¿ from prior wars? Are torture and violence against civilians the results of mishandled counterinsurgency, or are they inherent to the doctrine? Why have counterinsurgency strategies persisted despite long-term failures and public criticism? We will apply historical thinking to current debates by examining declassified government documents, films, photographs, music, television and radio broadcasts, memoirs, graffiti, and Oval Office tapes. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gruskin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Survey of Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 11N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (CLASSICS 26N)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: Saller, R. (PI)

HISTORY 11S: Dante's World: A Medieval and Renaissance Journey

Dante's epic through the afterlife has fascinated readers for centuries. Yet, his tale also comments upon and interprets his complex, violent, wealthy, and deeply religious world. This class will investigate that world, a world that included merchants, bankers, nobles, university students, friars, nuns, and heretics, popes, prostitutes, and the city-states in which they lived. Our guide to this world will be Italy¿s most famous medieval poet, philosopher, politician, critic, and exile, as we explore his society and culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bacich, C. (PI)

HISTORY 13C: Talking About Jews (JEWISHST 13C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 15D: The Civilization and Culture of the Middle Ages (HISTORY 115D, RELIGST 115X)

This course provides an introduction to Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. While the framework of the course is chronological, we¿ll concentrate particularly on the structure of medieval society. Rural and urban life, kingship and papal government, wars and plagues provide the context for our examination of the lives of medieval people, what they believed, and how they interacted with other, both within Christendom and beyond it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 16: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 116)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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