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HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 205E: Comparative Historical Development of Latin America and East Asia (HISTORY 305E, ILAC 267E)

Analysis, in historical perspective, of similarities and differences between development of Latin America and East Asia from early modern times to the present. Focusing primarily on Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico, on one hand, and China, Japan, and (South) Korea, on the other, topics include impact of colonial and postcolonial relationships on development of states, markets, and classes, as well as geopolitical, social, cultural, technological and environmental factors that shaped and were shaped by them.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 305K)

( History 205K is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305K is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 205L: Prostitution & Sex Trafficking: Regulating Morality and the Status of Women (CSRE 205L, FEMGEN 205L, HUMRTS 119)

Examines governmental policies toward prostitution from the late 19th century to the present. Focuses on the underlying attitudes, assumptions, strategies, and consequences of various historical and current legal frameworks regulating prostitution, including: prohibitionism, abolitionism, legalization, partial decriminalization, and full decriminalization. Special focus on these policies' effects on sex trafficking, sex worker rights, and the status of women. Emphasis on Europe and the U.S., with additional cases from across the globe.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 206E: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 207C: The Global Early Modern (HISTORY 307C)

In what sense can we speak of "globalization" before modernity? What are the characteristics and origins of the economic system we know as "capitalism"? When and why did European economies begin to diverge from those of other Eurasian societies? With these big questions in mind, the primary focus will be on the history of Europe and European empires, but substantial readings deal with other parts of the world, particularly China and the Indian Ocean. HISTORY 307C is a prerequisite for HISTORY 402 (Spring quarter).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

( History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 210D: Neighbors: Intimate Relationships and Everyday Life in Hitler's Europe

This course explores how different groups of people experienced Nazi rule in Germany and German-occupied Europe. While we will cover the general history of Hitler's rise to power, the prewar years of his rule, and the Second World War, our focus will be on the effects of fascism on everyday life and relationships between neighbors, family members, partners, friends, and coworkers. How did class, race, gender, religion, and sexual orientation interact with Nazi rule and occupation? The course pays special attention to the fate of European Jews and the Holocaust. On a theoretical level, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of "Alltagsgeschichte," or the history of everyday life, as an approach to studying Nazi rule. The course provides tools to manage efficiently a fairly high reading load, a skill that will greatly help students to succeed in future academic endeavors.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 210J: Fascism and Authoritarianism

This course introduces students to the history of fascist and authoritarian movements in modern Europe, from their origins through the post-WWII era. Germany and Italy will serve as central case studies, though the course will consider other examples as well. Through analytical consideration of secondary sources, primary texts, and art as political propaganda, we will interrogate the meanings and applications of these fraught and complex terms, the different forms taken by fascist and authoritarian movements, and their relationship to nationalism, race, religion, gender, and economic and political institutions. Why did millions of Europeans accept -- and even enthusiastically support -- fascist and authoritarian regimes? To what extent was a single, charismatic leader central to the success or failure of such governments? The course will conclude with an opportunity to reflect on the degree to which fascism and authoritarianism are concepts that remain relevant to political discourse in the twenty-first century.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 211: Out of Eden: Deportation, Exile, and Expulsion from Antiquity to the Renaissance (HISTORY 311, JEWISHST 211)

This course examines the long pedigree of modern deportations and mass expulsions, from the forced resettlements of the ancient world to the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492, and from the outlawry of Saga-era Iceland to the culture of civic exile in Renaissance Italy. The course focuses on Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the early modern period, but students are welcome to venture beyond these geographical and chronological boundaries for their final papers.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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